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Folk tales

  • Auteur:
    Yoda, Hiroko
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    Yokai Attack! is a nightmare-inducing one-stop guide to Japan's traditional monsters and creepy-crawlies. Yokai are ethereal sorts of beings, like ghosts, nearly always encountered at night; everyone has their own take on how they might look in real life and what sorts of specific characteristics and abilities they might have. This book is the result of long hours spent poring over data and descriptions from a variety of sources, including microfilms of eighteenth-century illustrations from the national Diet Library in Tokyo, in order to bring you detailed information on almost 50 of these amazing creatures for the first time in English. Illustrations, created by the talented Tatsuya Morino, detail the potential appearance of each yokai. Alongside each illustration is a series of "data points," with each yokai's important features at a glance-especially handy for any potential close encounters. Yokai Attack! will surely convince you that Japan's tradition of fascinating monsters is a long one-yet far from being history.

  • Auteur:
    Vernon, Steve
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    Steve Vernon has another collection of classic, bone-chilling tales to tell. Steve takes readers from one end of New Brunswick to the other, unearthing dark tales of strange happenings along the way-from the headless ghost that haunts those who pass through Johnville's covered bridge, to the spirit of a murdered man that guards long-buried treasure at Wolf Point. Drawing on documented stories and legends passed on by word-of-mouth, Steve sets one spooky scene after another with a storyteller's attention to every creepy detail, and just a touch of wry humour. It's as though you're sitting beside him at the campfire, as each story unfolds.

  • Auteur:
    Vernon, Steve
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    If you're from Halifax, you've probably heard that the Five Fisherman Restaurant is supposedly haunted, and that Georges Island is overrun with ghosts. If you're from Nova Scotia, you probably know about rumours of buried treasure on Oak Island, or about the UFO sighting in Shag Harbour. But what about the Grey Lady of Stoney Beach? Or the Ghost of Haddon Hall? Featuring addresses and GPS coordinates, this guide to Nova Scotian haunts maps out the origin stories of 50 spooky tales.

  • Auteur:
    Andrews, Jan
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    Follows the foolish, yet wise, Ti-Jean through three adventures as he outwits a greedy princess, a tiny scoundrel, and a very clever girl, in a collection of stories based on French-Canadian folk literature.

  • Auteur:
    Bridge, Kathryn, Neary, Kevin
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    There is a special place on the southeastern shores of Barkley Sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island. It is a magnificent landscape of rocky cliffs fronting onto the wild Pacific Ocean, sheltered beaches, lakes, mountains and forests. Since the beginning of time, it has been the ancestral home of the Huu-ay-aht First Nation. Drawing directly from oral history passed down by generations of Huu-ay-aht chiefs and elders, Kathryn Bridge and Kevin Neary tell the compelling stories of the Huu-ay-aht people from their perspective. This is a fascinating glimpse into the complex and rich history of a West Coast First Nation, from creation tales and accounts of their traditional ways to the recent Maa’nulth treaty.

  • Auteur:
    Gibbs, Ian
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    Ghost stories from Canada’s most haunted city, including tales from iconic sites such as the Empress hotel, Hatley Castle, and Ross Bay Cemetery. Beautiful, charming Victoria is world renowned for its seaside attractions, flourishing gardens, and breathtaking ocean views. But looming behind its picture-perfect façade is a city shrouded in mystery, with restless, disembodied beings that whisper ghastly tales of mystery, violence, and horror. Known as British Columbia’s most haunted city, Victoria is teeming with a plethora of spirits. Through this brand-new collection of disturbing tales, you’ll come face to face with: •The Grey Lady who chills hotel guests to the bone •A decorated World War I soldier who protects tenants from something sinister •An inconsolable child who haunts the pool area of a defunct hotel •The blood-soaked spectre who runs through the infamous Fan Tan Alley to escape capture •The ghost of Robert Johnson, who perpetually re-enacts his own suicide •The phantom of a cranky hermit who plagues a beautiful lake house •A spinster who gives tours of her childhood home •And many more Get to know Victoria’s best-known hauntings along with some you may have not have heard before.

  • Auteur:
    Pelly, David F., Crockatt, Kim, Klengenberg, Elsie Anaginak
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    The story of Uvajuq (oo-va-yook) is rooted in a time when people and animals lived in such harmony and unity that they could speak to each other. For Inuit, as for people whose traditions include the story of the Garden of Eden, this idyllic existence came to an abrupt end a long time ago. The story told here, in words and pictures, speaks of that ancient event and of the transition to an existence where a different kind of sharing prevails.This old Inuit legend has recently taken on an entirely new dimension in Cambridge Bay, with the uncovering of a unique array of artifacts during an archaeological survey of the hill known as Uvajuq. The mysterious find offers a compelling confluence of myth and reality.The legend of Uvajuq, as told here, was collected from a group of Inuit elders in the Nunavut community of Cambridge Bay, 300 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle. On the surface, it is the story of how three prominent hills near the community were formed. Underlying that is a tale of much deeper significance.

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    All cultures have tales of the trickster – a crafty creature or being who uses cunning to get food, steal precious possessions, or simply cause mischief. He disrupts the order of things, often humiliating others and sometimes himself. In Native American traditions, the trickster takes many forms, from coyote or rabbit to raccoon or raven. The first graphic anthology of Native American trickster tales, Trickster brings together Native American folklore and the world of comics. In Trickster, 24 Native storytellers were paired with 24 comic artists, telling cultural tales from across America. Ranging from serious and dramatic to funny and sometimes downright fiendish, these tales bring tricksters back into popular culture.

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    Ces douze études ont été présentées par une équipe de chercheurs africains, nord-américains et européens réunis en 2012 à Vancouver. Elles soulèvent plusieurs dimensions du problème des traditions orales : l'oralité et les écrivaines africaines, la place de l'oeuvre de Boubacar Boris Diop entre oralité, histoire et mémoire et la conceptualisation critique de l'oralité. Quel est l'enjeu de l'oralité en rapport avec la mémoire, l'amnésie et la réconciliation ?

  • Auteur:
    Bar-el, Dan
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    Princess Jill excels at jousting, fencing, skating and long-distance spitting. Her brother, King Jack, loves baking and spending time with Little Bo Peep and her sheep. So what's a princess to do when she receives a mysterious letter from the land of Grimm? Take up ballroom dancing? Not Princess Jill. All alone, with only her wits to guide her, Jill sets off to rescue the citizens of Grimm. Along the way she makes many odd new friends and discovers the value of listening to your mother.

  • Auteur:
    Powe, B W
    Sommaire:

    Images overrun the world. Toons filled with rage and hate hunger for life. A war between simulations and humans. People besieged in a castle of dreams. A mysterious knight shifts between worlds, holding the secret that could save all. Orphaned children lead him to the whirlwind, the terrible faceless source. B.W. Powe's stunning fable erases the lines between illusion and reality. Visionary, poet, novelist, essayist, B.W. Powe is the author of the influential books, Mystic Trudeau, The Solitary Outlaw and Towards a Canada of Light, the novel Outage and the book of poetry, The Unsaid Passing (Guernica, 2005). The latter was a finalist for the ReLit Prize. He was the program coordinator for three significant symposia - Marshall McLuhan: What If He Was Right? (1997), The Trudeau Era (1998), and Living Literacies (2002), all held at York University.

  • Auteur:
    Greenham, Cyril W.
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    The Yarns We Had is a collection of stories that were handed down to Cyril W. Greenham by his father, Wilbur Greenham, and grandfather, Andrew (Chum) Greenham. Both men were fishermen and seagoing captains from Notre Dame Bay, and in this collection, they relate the wit and humour of outport Newfoundlanders in the early to mid-twentieth century.

    On the surface, these oral histories are the lighthearted reminiscences of the fun and mischief these rough-and-ready men and their friends got into after their work was done. Tall tales of moonshine makers dodging the law, devilish pranksters aboard fishing vessels, raucous rows and bawdy misbehaviour in a religious-minded community—this book has it all.

    However, underneath the comedy, these stories are a reminder of a time when life was difficult and the average family didn’t know if they would survive from one year to the next. People worked hard and had very little money, but despite this, they maintained a sense of humour that, to this day, makes Newfoundland and Labrador one of the most hospitable places in the world.

  • Auteur:
    Walters, Eric, Todd, Sue, Down, Christian
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    This is an enhanced ebook with a read-along function. Inspired by a story told to the author while on safari in 2015, The Wild Beast describes the creation of one of Africa's most unusual animals, the wildebeest. According to oral tradition, the Creator built this unique beast out of leftover parts from other magnificent animals found on the continent. Horns from buffalos and stripes meant for zebras. Tails from giraffes and bumps meant for camels. This creative retelling will introduce little ones to a story rich in both imagery and in lesson: Take what you need to live. Take no more. Waste nothing.

  • Auteur:
    Ding, Jing Jing, Daboud, Nelson
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    A story of three Buddhist monks based on a traditional Chinese folk tale about cooperation. Without cooperation, one monk can fetch two buckets of water, two monks will only be able to fetch one bucket of water, and three monks will fetch no water at all.

  • Auteur:
    Jessome, Bill
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    This latest collection by Maritime Mysteries' former TV host and actor Bill Jessome includes forty of the best stories collected from around the Maritimes. Using his journalist's skills, Jessome weaves incredible stories that charm readers and chill our nerves. Maritime Canada has an extensive storytelling tradition and a large part of that storytelling lexicon consists of stories of the supernatural. Many of these stories are told over the generations and Jessome has acquired these chilling accounts by listening to Maritimers at the kitchen table, around the flickering campfire, and when the moon is full.

  • Auteur:
    Meuse, Theresa, Stevens, Arthur
    Sommaire:

    Matthew loves to play games with his friends and share his toys with them. But most of all he loves to share the special treasures that remind him of his First Nations culture. Perhaps his favourite treasure is the medicine pouch that his grandfather made especially for him. This is where he keeps many of his other treasures, including the sacred herbs his mother gave him. Matthew uses the herbs to remind him to be grateful for everything that nature gives us. Another special gift is the eagle feather from his father. Matthew knows that the eagle is a symbol of the spiritual strength of his culture. But there is one other gift that has a special place in Matthew's heart. It is the dream catcher that Matthew gave to his friend Dustin to help him not have bad dreams. The Sharing Circle is a collection of seven stories about First Nations culture and spiritual practices: The Eagle Feather, The Dream Catcher, The Sacred Herbs, The Talking Circle, The Medicine Wheel, The Drum, and The Medicine Pouch. Researched and written by Mi'kmaw children's author Theresa Meuse-Dallien, and beautifully illustrated by Mi'kmaw illustrator Arthur Stevens, this book will engage and inform children of all ages.

  • Auteur:
    Simpson, Caroll
    Sommaire:

    In her third book inspired by First Nations’ stories, children’s author and illustrator Caroll Simpson explains the significance of community values. She introduces readers to a world of creatures like Sea Lion, Killer Whale, Dogfish and Kingfisher. Her dramatic tale of young twins and their transformation shows how working together keeps a community healthy.When new twins are born in a mythical Pacific Coast village, everyone celebrates because the birth of twins is a rare occasion; twins are the children of the salmon. But when the twins grow selfish and greedy, Thunderbird transforms them into a Two-Headed Sea Serpent. Can the Serpent’s heads learn to work together? The question becomes more important when the salmon don’t run up the river and the villagers start to go hungry. The Serpent’s heads have to co-operate with each other to solve the mystery and restore the salmon run.Written for children aged 3 to 10, this charming story is illustrated with Simpson’s distinctive colour paintings that celebrate First Nations culture. A glossary of mythical creatures and sea life provides informative teaching points and invites further exploration of West Coast cultures.

  • Auteur:
    Baker, E. D.
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    Thirteen-year-old Grassina vies with her older sister, Chartreuse, to see who will inherit the family's talent for magic and become the Green Witch, while each ponders which prince will be at her side during her "happily ever after."

  • Auteur:
    Various
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    The identity of Mother Goose may remain a mystery, but the timeless appeal of the fairy tales and nursery rhymes associated with this cherished imaginary author has lasted for generations of young readers. This collection includes more than three hundred of Mother Goose's best-known and best-loved nursery rhymes for children. Here, Humpty Dumpty has a great fall, Jack and Jill go up the hill, and the dish runs away with the spoon. Peter Piper picks a peck of pickled peppers, little Miss Muffet sits on a tuffet, and Mother Goose herself rides through the air on a very fine gander. Also included are favorites such as "Three Blind Mice," "Little Bo-Peep," "Hot Cross-Buns," and "Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary." This collection, taken from the 1916 copyright edition, features charming full-color illustrations by Blanche Fisher Wright.

  • Auteur:
    Hamilton, Virginia
    Sommaire:

    An anthology of traditional American Black folktales retold by the African-American woman to win a Newbery Medal and the first children's book author to be awarded a MacArthur Genius Grant.

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