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Poetry

  • Auteur:
    Nichol, bp
    Sommaire:

    Originally twelve years in the making! Featuring a cast of thousands. It still stars the letter H, and introduces Probable Systems, Negatives, and the Actual Life of Language! Your heart will pound as you see H's turn into I's before your very own eyes. You'll thrill as words fall apart only to create other words. You'll gasp as bp Nichol collaborates with the dead. You'll shake your head in disbelief as he walks the line between fact and fiction one step beyond into the twilight zone of pataphysics.

  • Auteur:
    Hartsfield, Carla
    Sommaire:

    Longlisted for the 2004 ReLit Awards

    Carla Hartsfield sings praises to the unusual: a rose blooming in December; an angel dancing on a cardiologist’s scanner; Glenn Gould playing Brahms at Angelo’s Garage. But these are common occurrences in Your Last Day on Earth, the everyday world and the metaphysical realm sharing the same ecstatic poem. Hartsfield transforms the contents of her psyche into music that we can all hear, the kind that replays for days in the dark, dreamy parts of our selves.

    She was here inside the purple-eyed daisies
    and honeysuckle lining the fence —

    arriving seconds after visiting the moon,
    her starched, white dress

    cascading from frothy clouds —
    but even more white like the light

    that is said to emanate from reverence.

    from “Nightshine”

    “Carla Hartsfield is, like a figure in one of these vivid poems, ‘a charming pyromaniac.’ Under her magnifying glass, the world bristles into smoke: the ‘starched hexagons’ of Queen Anne’s Lace ‘quiver with cocaine bloom’ and water drops become ‘diamonds’ on the speaker’s skin when she plays Bach naked after a shower. Sometimes these fires liberate, sometimes they celebrate, sometimes they memorialize, and always they transform.” – Stephanie Bolster

  • Auteur:
    Gillis, Susan
    Sommaire:

    Inviting, human, capacious poems that grapple with ideas while also lightly grieving our capacity for ruin.

  • Auteur:
    Henderson, Brian
    Sommaire:

    Year Zero is the time of hushed beginnings and endings, the place of naming and unnaming, where language, strange to itself, tiptoes along songlines as though following passages of Koto music. In Brian Henderson’s poetry, poised and listening on this hinge of creativity, ontological wonder is informed by awareness of the paradoxes at the heart of language, that language wants you for itself, and that what is named, falls. Whether focusing on the dying of a parent or fellow poet, or on the coming-to-be of a child, this poetry is alive with the truth that “The dead burn through us/ the not yet born.”

    “What a wonderful book this is! Henderson tells the old story how dear ones die, and new lives come to be. In a world that’s dense, opaque, yet lit with random hints of something being uttered. The result is a marvel of passionate, glancing eloquence. I wanted it never to end.” –Dennis Lee

  • Auteur:
    Conroy, Pat
    Sommaire:

    How should we improve the state of South Carolina? That invitingly open-ended question served as the basis for the first annual South Carolina High School Writing Contest as the call went out in fall 2013 to juniors and seniors across the Palmetto State, encouraging them to take a stance through good, thought-provoking writing. The nearly 500 responses that resulted were as impressive in quality as they were in quantity. Young writers sounded off on issues of race relations, environmental conservation, economic imbalance, opportunities of infrastructure, substance and physical abuse, and the maladies of education. Most wrote on issues of education rooted in their own burgeoning awareness of its gifts and limitations in their lives. From that pool of contestants, 23 finalists rose to the top to have their initial entries and subsequent writing on a favorite book or place judged by best-selling author Pat Conroy. The insightful and often revelatory responses from those finalists — including the first-, second- and third-place winners by grade — are collected here in Writing South Carolina. In heartfelt essays, poems, short stories and drama, these diverse writers lay bare their attitudes and impressions of South Carolina as they have experienced it and as they hope to reshape it. The resulting anthology is a compelling portrait of the Palmetto State's potential as advocated by some of its best and brightest young writers. Editor Steven Lynn provides an introduction, and contest judge Pat Conroy provides a foreword to the collection.

  • Auteur:
    Berry, Julie
    Sommaire:

    Reading Julie Berry’s poetry means entering a new poetic space, crossing thresholds of pain and delight at once raw and refined. “like marie d’oignies who buried bloody/ mouthfuls of herself/ in the garden/ i need my poems to be like this,” Berry writes in “Touching Ground.”  “Like this” is finely-turned and constantly surprising, haunting as plainsong, throaty as the blues. Her images are so completely unexpected and yet so thoroughly right that you are left wondering why you never imagined “the minute hand [falling] into the refrigerator and breakfast/ . . . clattering across the lawn/ its spoons and bowls and burning toast.” Her eye is keen and quirky; its wide embrace enfolds the highways and cemeteries of southwestern Ontario, flying pianos, her lover’s ex-neck, Elizabeth Graves Simcoe, furniture cleaners, suicides and mass strandings. And of course her reader. Here is a poet whose honesty and wry humour loosen the tangles of the heart.

    “When you walk into the world with these poems in your head, the world has a new clarity, more light. The most startling and unforgettable book of poetry I’ve read in a long time.” – Susan Musgrave

  • Auteur:
    Mead, Jane
    Sommaire:

    Mead's fifth collection candidly and openly explores the long process that is death. These resonant poems discover what it means to live, die, and come home again. We're drawn in by sorrow and grief, but also the joys of celebrating a long life and how simple it is to find laughter and light in the quietest and darkest of moments.

  • Auteur:
    Venart, S.E.
    Sommaire:

    Longlisted for the 2008 ReLit Awards

    Whatever their subject — the unwinding of lovers, childhood as the foundation of being, the metaphorical life of everyday objects and events — S.E. Venart’s poems show us a kind of courage that is quotidian. Surviving childhood, surviving failed love, finding solace in the self, and reinvigorating that self: this is the world Venart reveals to us, in all its prescient detail. A honest and lyrical first book.

    …The car gained momentum, sped down hills.
    Over one tanned sister’s shoulder I saw vivid fields

    locked behind white lengths of birch. Wires loped
    between attendant poles. Strapped into our seats,

    we had in common things we couldn’t get at.
    Up on the wires, small birds alighted, fluttered off

    as if together they’d all heard
    the same charged message.

    from “Power Lines”

    “Venart’s poetry reveals itself in the world of mysteries that lies between ‘one bright orange next to one bright knife.’ Such is the domestic tension she creates, where home is turned inside out so the familiar becomes unfamiliar. Yet the power of her writing shows how simple things, observed with clarity, are lit from within. This is a book to read, then read again: once for the bright orange and once for the bright knife.”

    -Anne Simpson

  • Auteur:
    D'Iorio, Chris
    Sommaire:

    Tragic-comedic genius emerges in this first book by Chris D’Iorio, kaleidoscopically vivid poetry that is commoditized with the placid title of Without Blue, innocently confessing a condition of lack-lustre lack. A few disarmingly personal lyrics usher us into a book that seems rather sincere and contemplative. Then the intensely capable drive of the poet shifts gears into his Grand Prix artistic race that pits the mud of cynicism against poetry’s slickly navigable satirical engine of agency. Homer, Mallarmé and Ginsberg cohort with D’Iorio in a serious call out of our culture’s infatuation with breakneck profit, profligate glamour and political impunity.

  • Auteur:
    Schulman, Grace
    Sommaire:

    "Without a Claim is a modern Book of Psalms. Indeed, the glory in these radiant sacred songs meld an art of high music with a nuanced love of the world unlike any we've heard before. No matter your mood upon entering this world you'll soon be grateful, and enchanted. In any such house of praise, God herself must be grateful."-Philip Schultz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Failure and The God of Loneliness Grace Schulman, who has been called "a vital and permanent poet" (Harold Bloom), makes new the life she finds in other cultures and in the distant past. In Without a Claim, she masterfully encompasses music, faith, art, and history. The title poem alludes to the Montauk sachem who sold land without any concept of rights to property, and meditates on our own notion of ownership: "No more than geese in flight, shadowing the lawn, / cries piercing wind, do we possess these fields, / given the title, never the dominion." She traces the illusion of rights, from land to objects, from our loves to our very selves. Alternatively, she finds permanence in art, whether in galleries or on cave walls, and in music, whether in the concert hall, on the streets of New York, or in the waves at sea.

  • Auteur:
    Vallotton, Jean-Pierre
    Sommaire:

    Where other poets of his generation developed strategies of deconstruction, Jean-Pierre Vallotton invented a brave new mosaic with the parameters left behind by traditionalism, modernism and postmodernism. If William Wordsworth, Oscar Wilde, T.S. Eliot are considered decadent, then so is Jean-Pierre Vallotton a decadent; however, the sort of decadent that will be viewed as being great in years to come: “The space between us is a path of magnificence, and here the faintest of our footsteps draws forth a flower.” His neo-baroque poetry stands at the crossroads of whatever styles, forms, and contents led to this spot; and it is with the pernicious artefacts found here that Jean-Pierre Vallotton invents the unknown structures that will welcome the birds of paradise of tomorrow.

  • Auteur:
    Blake, William
    Sommaire:

    A poet, artist, and mystic, Blake declared that "I must Create a System or be enslav'd by another Man's." And create he did. Included here are such well-known poems as "Tyger! Tyger! burning bright."

  • Auteur:
    Brossard, Nicole, Majzels, Robert, Moure, Erín
    Sommaire:

    Between the verbs quivering and streaming, White Piano unfolds its variations like musical scores. A play of resonance between pronouns and persons, freely percussive between prose and poetry, and narrating a constellation of questions, White Piano offers readers a 'language that cultivates its own craters of fire and savoir-vie.

  • Auteur:
    Lavoie, Chantel
    Sommaire:

    This collection offers five answers to the question its title implies: within us, in wild things, in change over time, in teething and in being left behind. Beginning in the prairies and moving both in time and direction, the poems navigate the terrors in the territories of love, faith, birth and death. The poet embraces folktales and children’s stories, the Bible and the weather, humanity’s murky past and its murkier future. Chantel Lavoie voices the fears we cherish, as well as the pain we seek, in mythologies near and far from home.

  • Auteur:
    Clarke, Austin
    Sommaire:

    Three Canadian soldiers awaiting deployment to Afghanistan beat a homeless man to death on the steps of their armoury after a night of heavy drinking. The poet, whose downtown Toronto home overlooks the armoury and surrounding park, describes the crime, its perpetrators, the victim, and a cast of homeless witnesses that includes the woman, a prostitute, who first alerts police. The subsequent trial evokes reflection on the immigrant experience the poet shares with one of the accused, and on the agony of that young soldier's mother. From Kandahar to Bridgetown to Mississauga, Ontario, Where the Sun Shines Best encompasses a tragedy of epic scope, a lyrical meditation on poverty, racism and war, and a powerful indictment of the ravages of imperialism.

  • Auteur:
    Eso, David, Lynes, Jeanette
    Sommaire:

    Under the covers of Where the Nights Are Twice as Long: Love Letters of Canadian Poets, David Eso and Jeanette Lynes collect letters and epistolary poems from more than 120 Canadian poets, including Pauline Johnson, Malcolm Lowry, Louis Riel, Alden Nowlan, Anne Szumigalski , Leonard Cohen, John Barton, and Di Brandt, and many others, encompassing the breadth of this country's English literary history. Presented in order not of the chronology of composition, but according to the poets' ages at the time of writing, the poems in the book comprise a single lifeline. The reader follows an amalgam of the Poet from the passionate intensity of youth, through the regrets and satisfactions of adulthood and middle age, and into the reflective wisdom of old age. All the writings are about love, but love in a dizzying array of colours, shapes, and sizes. Deep, enduring love, unrequited love, passionate love, violent love. Here are odes and lyric ecstasies, tirades and tantrums, pastoral comforts and abject horrors — all delivered with the vibrancy, wit, and erudition of our finest poets. Where the Nights Are Twice as Long is more than an anthology: it is an unforgettable journey into the long night of love.

  • Auteur:
    Catalano, Francis
    Sommaire:

    Francis Catalano's poetry speaks of space, place and people. In the extracts from Index and qu'une lueur des lieux geographical, geological, geometrical and ancestral textures, shapes and colours kaleidoscope to create powerful North American landscapes. Wide open skies, craggy mountains, blinding snow, endless straight black top roads and fast food outlets reflect, refract and radiate in multi-facetted verse. In Romamor, framed within a city's walls, another dimension is added contrasting light and darkness, space and proximity. Where Spaces Glow invites you to reach out and feel the finely chiselled, radiant pieces of Catalano's beautifully crafted poetic terrestrial jigsaw.

  • Auteur:
    Powe, B.W.
    Sommaire:

    This powerful, beautiful book blends parables, aphorisms, dreams, fantasies, anecdotes, witticisms, puns, vignettes, and prose poems in a meditative and often passionate way. It takes the risk of being free in its style and form, to affirm the possibilities of thought, spirit, heart, humour, and imagination. Here B.W. Powe gives us his boldest, most soul-revealing work to date.

  • Auteur:
    Korzan, Mary Rita Schilke
    Sommaire:

    "When I wrote a tribute for my mother years ago, I never anticipated it would take a worldwide journey. Nonetheless, that is exactly what happened. The story I am about to share with you may read like fiction. I can assure you, there is nothing in the world that has ever been more true." —Mary Rita Korzan Mary Rita Schilke Korzan wrote a poem to her mother 24 years ago, thanking her for all she had done as a mother, friend and role model. She gave the poem to her mother and, a few months later, offered it as a tribute when Mary and her husband were married. So many wedding guests asked for a copy that Mary included one in her thank-you notes. Thus began the strange and heartwarming journey of Mary's poem to her mom. Friends passed it on to those they knew. A minister in her hometown couldn't recall who gave it to him, but he included the by-then "anonymously written" poem in his book about loving others. Another author picked it up from there for her compilation of heartfelt works, and Mary finally noticed her poem, now listed as "Author Unknown," in A Fourth Course of Chicken Soup for the Soul, which her husband and children gave her as a Mother's Day gift. With When You Thought I Wasn't Looking, readers have the chance to experience Mary's poem in its entirety and from its creator. This is the special kind of book that reminds us that sometimes the little things we do "just because" mean more to someone than we can imagine. Those little things teach love, compassion and understanding. In other words, they're priceless. This sweet gift book brings that lesson home to the heart.

  • Auteur:
    Milne, A. A.
    Sommaire:

    From the unabridged collection "A.A. Milne's Pooh Classics," here are all of the poems and verses from When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six.

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