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Social science

  • Auteur:
    White, Jonathan
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    Writer, sailor, and surfer Jonathan White takes listeners across the globe to discover the science and spirit of ocean tides.

  • Auteur:
    Twigg, Alan
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    Alan Twigg has here recovered the amazing story of how George and Ingeborg while travelling in northern India in 1961 encountered many of the Tibetan refugees who had fled over the mountain passes. Appalled by the condition of the children, huddled together with inadequate bedding, surviving on a diet of thin soup and momos, steamed dumplings of mixed wheat and corn flour, they expressed their desire to help. "You must absolutely come and see uncle," said a young girl. This was Khando Yapshi, the Dalai Lama's niece. Among the first Westerners to meet with the Dalai Lama, the Woodcocks vowed to provide humanitarian assistance. This was was the genesis for the Tibetan Refugee Aid Society (TRAS), one of two remarkable non-profit charities spearheaded by the Woodcocks. Since 1962, TRAS has raised over $500,000 and has undertaken 300 projects. Both of the Woodcocks' volunteer-based low-overhead organizations are still going strong today.

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    Thunder at Michigan and Thunder in the Heartland is about a chronicle of changes that took place in a small school in a major Midwestern university. The change that took place had a profound impact upon both the students and faculty involved in the Environmental Advocacy Program. Thunder at Michigan and in the Heartland was written in hopes that it would influence other faculty to engage in activities to change the way in which students are taught.

  • Auteur:
    Mahood, Linda
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    As a national network of roads and hostels spread across Canada, so did the practice of hitchhiking. Thumbing a Ride examines its rise and fall in the 1970s, drawing on records from the time. Many equated adventure travel with freedom and independence, but a counter-narrative emerged of girls gone missing and other dangers. Town councillors, community groups, and motorists demanded a clampdown on a transient youth movement they believed was spreading anti-establishment nomadism. Linda Mahood asks new questions about hitchhiking as a rite of passage, and about adult intervention that turned a subculture into a pressing moral and social issue.

  • Auteur:
    Render, William H.
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    A fascinating look'first published in 1894'at two philanthropists known as the "Prisoner's Friends" and the early history of prison reform. Prisons in England were once dark, inhumane places lacking any regulations. The facilities were poorly managed and unsanitary, and prisoners were treated like animals. One man and one woman, the "Prisoner's Friends," sought to change that. Through Prison Bars is an in-depth account of John Howard and Elizabeth Fry and their work in the prison reform movement in Great Britain and Europe that began in the eighteenth century and continued into the nineteenth. Author William H. Render explores their childhoods and family lives, deeply spiritual backgrounds'Howard was a Calvinist while Fry was a dedicated Quaker'and early days in prison philanthropy, as well as what motivated them to get involved in the first place: Howard's early days as the high sheriff of Bedfordshire and Fry's visit to the women's prison at Newgate in London. Neither Howard nor Fry stopped their work with just one jail. They dedicated their lives to serving God and man, and their stories have the power to inspire similar dedication in generations to come.

  • Auteur:
    Popova, Elena
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    The American dream has been part of world mythology for generations now. As the land of opportunity, America still entices people from around the world to taste it for themselves. Marrying an American has been one of the most popular means since single Irishmen or Italians looked for brides from the old country in the 19th century. Since the end of the Cold War, East Europeans are one of the latest waves to give it a try. Some come here, marry and live happily ever after. Some discover the country (or the man of their dreams) is different from what they were expecting, and find the cultural leap a bit too much. Given the contrasts, contradictions, eccentricities and peculiarities (add to that the pain of leaving one's homeland, difficulties with a new language), many relationships stumble. One question stands out to a newcomer: Why are so many Americans stressed out and so unhappy despite their signature smiles? We knew that everything the communists told us about communism was a lie, the Russians say, but we didn't realize that what they told us about capitalism was true. How much difference is there between Soviet propaganda and American spin? With the eye of a keen observer, the author humorously highlights inconsistencies and ambiguities in our culture. She crisscrosses the country from deep in the heart of Dixie, where even food is a matter of right or wrong, to the environmentally conscious Northwest, where one might drive to the recycling center in a military-style S.U.V. just to drop off last year's electronic gadget. The America that foreign wives experience is a land that the natives have not seen for themselves. Adaptation to the new life demands moral courage and profound compromises. One cannot avoid the  melting pot; it will choose for her or him what will be retained and what will be lost. The dream of America does not always have a storybook ending.

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    Ellis, Deborah
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    In a rehabilitation center for disabled children, twelve-year-old Nora says she loves the color pink and chewing gum and explains that the wheels of her wheelchair are like her legs. Eleven-year-old Mohammad describes how his house was demolished by soldiers. And we meet twelve-year-old Salam, whose older sister walked into a store in Jerusalem and blew herself up, killing herself and two people, and injuring twenty others. All these children live both ordinary and extraordinary lives. They argue with their siblings. They dream about their wishes for the future. They have also seen their homes destroyed, their families killed, and they live in the midst of constant upheaval and violence. This simple and telling book allows children everywhere to see those caught in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as children just like themselves, but who are living far more difficult, dangerous lives.

  • Auteur:
    Jerkins, Morgan
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    From one of the fiercest critics writing today, Morgan Jerkins' highly-anticipated collection of linked essays interweaves her incisive commentary on pop culture, feminism, black history, misogyny, and racism with her own experiences to confront the very real challenges of being a black woman today-perfect for fans of Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me, and Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie's We Should All Be Feminists. Morgan Jerkins is only in her twenties, but she has already established herself as an insightful, brutally honest writer who isn't afraid of tackling tough, controversial subjects. In This Will Be My Undoing, she takes on perhaps one of the most provocative contemporary topics: What does it mean to "be"-to live as, to exist as-a black woman today' This is a book about black women, but it's necessary reading for all Americans.Doubly disenfranchised by race and gender, often deprived of a place within the mostly white mainstream feminist movement, black women are objectified, silenced, and marginalized with devastating consequences, in ways both obvious and subtle, that are rarely acknowledged in our country's larger discussion about inequality. In This Will Be My Undoing, Jerkins becomes both narrator and subject to expose the social, cultural, and historical story of black female oppression that influences the black community as well as the white, male-dominated world at large. Whether she's writing about Sailor Moon; Rachel Dolezal; the stigma of therapy; her complex relationship with her own physical body; the pain of dating when men say they don't "see color"; being a black visitor in Russia; the specter of "the fast-tailed girl" and the paradox of black female sexuality; or disabled black women in the context of the "Black Girl Magic" movement, Jerkins is compelling and revelatory.

  • Auteur:
    Jessup, Heather
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    This Is Not a Hoax shows how the work of some contemporary artists and writers intentionally disrupts the curatorial and authorial practices of the country's most respected cultural institutions: art galleries, museums, and book publishers. This first-ever study of contemporary Canadian hoaxes in visual art and literature asks why we trust authority in artistic works and how that trust is manifest. This book claims that hoaxes, far from being merely lies meant to deceive or wound, may exert a positive influence. Through their insistent disobedience, they assist viewers and readers in re-examining unquestioned institutional trust, habituated cultural hierarchies, and the deeply inscribed racism and sexism of Canada's settler-colonial history. Through its attentive look at hoaxical works by Canadian artists Iris Häussler, Brian Jungen, and Rebecca Belmore, photographer Jeff Wall, and writers and translators David Solway and Erin Mouré, this book celebrates the surprising ways hoaxes call attention to human capacities for flexibility, adaptation, and resilience in a cultural moment when radical empathy and imagination is critically needed.

  • Auteur:
    Lamothe, Matt
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    Follow the real lives of seven kids from Italy, Japan, Iran, India, Peru, Uganda, and Russia for a single day! In Japan Kei plays Freeze Tag, while in Uganda Daphine likes to jump rope. But while the way they play may differ, the shared rhythm of their days'and this one world we all share'unites them. This genuine exchange provides a window into traditions that may be different from our own as well as a mirror reflecting our common experiences. Inspired by his own travels, Matt Lamothe transports readers across the globe and back with this luminous and thoughtful picture book.

  • Auteur:
    Massaquoi, Notisha, Wane, Njoki Nathani
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    Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought is a collection of articles by Black Canadian feminists centralizing the ways in which Black femininity and Black women’s experiences are integral to understanding political and social frameworks in Canada. What does Black feminist thought mean to Black Canadian feminists in the Diaspora? What does it means to have a feminist practice which speaks to Black women in Canada? In exploring this question, this anthology collects new ideas and thoughts on the place of Black women’s politics in Canada, combining the work of new/upcoming and established names in Black Canadian feminist studies. There are very few collections within Canada that have been produced with a Black Canadian feminist agenda in mind. This book stands out as a landmark contribution to feminist scholarship in general and the new and emerging area of Canadian Black feminist thought specifically. More broadly, this anthology is a celebration of Black Canadian women’s lives, situating those lives in the Canadian landscape, and giving context and meaning to those lives in Canadian feminist theory and politics.

  • Auteur:
    Haysom, Simone, Lamwaka, Beatrice, Komba, Neema, Edozien, Chike Frankie, Allfrey, Ellah Wakatama
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    Illuminating African narratives for readers both inside and outside the continent. Representing the very best of African creative nonfiction, Safe House brings together works from Africa's contemporary literary greats. In a collection that ranges from travel writing and memoir to reportage and meditative essays, editor Ellah Wakatama Allfrey has brought together some of the most talented writers of creative nonfiction from across Africa. This collection of the first five singles from the Safe House anthology gathers work from the very best of contemporary African writers. Includes: The Life and Death of Rowan Du Preez by Simone Haysom The Mission at Verona by Beatrice Lamwaka The Search for Magical Mbuji by Neema Komba Forgetting Lamido by Chike Frankie Edozien

  • Auteur:
    Diamond, Jared M.
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    Draws on decades of field work in the Pacific islands and other world regions to illuminate the degree to which modern society reflects traditional cultures from earlier and ancient time periods.

  • Auteur:
    Henderson, John S.
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    Henderson explores the entire Maya cultural tradition, from the earliest traces of settlement through the period of the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century. 

  • Auteur:
    Greer, John Michael
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    Our destructive obsession with money and economic growth has driven us to the brink of disaster. This book exposes the flaws in conventional economic theory and shows how through public policy initiatives and personal choices the economy can be restructured at an appropriate scale with a focus on the natural world.

  • Auteur:
    Davis, Wade
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    Every culture is a unique answer to a fundamental question: What does it mean to be human and alive? In The Wayfinders, renowned anthropologist, winner of the prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize, and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis leads us on a thrilling journey to celebrate the wisdom of the world's indigenous cultures. In Polynesia we set sail with navigators whose ancestors settled the Pacific ten centuries before Christ. In the Amazon we meet the descendants of a true lost civilization, the Peoples of the Anaconda. In the Andes we discover that the earth really is alive, while in Australia we experience Dreamtime, the all-embracing philosophy of the first humans to walk out of Africa. We then travel to Nepal, where we encounter a wisdom hero, a Bodhisattva, who emerges from forty-five years of Buddhist retreat and solitude. And finally we settle in Borneo, where the last rainforest nomads struggle to survive. Understanding the lessons of this journey will be our mission for the next century. For at risk is the human legacy -- a vast archive of knowledge and expertise, a catalogue of the imagination. Rediscovering a new appreciation for the diversity of the human spirit, as expressed by culture, is among the central challenges of our time.

  • Auteur:
    Coontz, Stephanie
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    Leave It to Beaver was not a documentary, a man's home has never been his castle, the 'male breadwinner marriage' is the least traditional family in history, and sexual assault was more common in the 1970s than today. Acclaimed historian Stephanie Coontz examines two centuries of the American family, sweeping away misconceptions about the past that cloud current debates about domestic life. Now more relevant than ever, this book is a potent corrective to dangerous nostalgia for an America that never really existed.

  • Auteur:
    Lorinc, John, McClelland, Michael, Scheinberg, Ellen, Taylor, Tatum
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    The story of the growth and destruction of Toronto’s first 'priority neighbourhood.' From the 1840s until the Second World War, waves of newcomers who migrated to Toronto - Irish, Jewish, Italian, African American and Chinese, among others - landed in 'The Ward.' Crammed with rundown housing and immigrant-owned businesses, this area, bordered by College and Queen, University and Yonge streets, was home to bootleggers, Chinese bachelors, workers from the nearby Eaton's garment factories and hard-working peddlers. But the City considered it a slum, and bulldozed the area in the late 1950s to make way for a new civic square. The Ward finally tells the diverse stories of this extraordinary and resilient neighbourhood through archival photos and contributions from a wide array of voices, including historians, politicians, architects, storytellers, journalists and descendants of Ward residents. Their perspectives on playgrounds, tuberculosis, sex workers, newsies and even bathing bring The Ward to life and, in the process, raise important questions about how contemporary cities handle immigration, poverty and the geography of difference. Contents & Contributors Introduction - John Lorinc Searching for the Old Ward - Shawn Micallef  No Place Like Home - Howard Akler Before the Ward: Macauleytown - Stephen A. Otto  My Grandmother the Bootlegger - Howard Moscoe  Against All Odds: The Chinese Laundry - Arlene Chan VJ Day - Arlene Chan Merle Foster's Studio: 'A Spot Of Enchantment' - Terry Murray Missionary Work: The Fight for Jewish Souls - Ellen Scheinberg  King of the Ward - Myer Siemiatycki  Where the Rich Went for Vice - Michael Redhill A Fresh Start: Black Toronto in the 19th Century - Karolyn Smardz Frost Policing the Lord's Day - Mariana Valverde 'The Maniac Chinaman' - Edward Keenan Elsie's Story - Patte Roseban Lawren Harris's Ward Period - Jim Burant  'Fool's Paradise': Hastings' Anti-Slum Crusade - John Lorinc Strange Brew: The Underground Economy of Blind Pigs - Ellen Scheinberg  The Consulate, the Padroni and the Labourers - Andrea Addario Excerpt: The Italians in Toronto - Emily P. Weaver Arthur Goss: Documenting Hardship - Stephen Bulger Fresh Air: The Fight Against TB - Cathy Crowe The Stone Yard - Gaetan Heroux William James: Toronto's First Photojournalist - Vincenzo Pietropaolo The Avenue Not Taken - Michael McClelland Timothy Eaton's Stern Fortifications - Michael Valpy Settling In: Central Neighbourhood House - Ratna Omidvar and Ranjit Bhaskar Toronto's Girl with the Curls - Ellen Scheinberg Chinese Cafes: Survival and Danger - Ellen Scheinberg and Paul Yee Defiance and Divisions: The Great Eaton's Strike - Ruth A. Frager Elizabeth Street: What the City Directories Reveal - Denise Balkissoon Growing Up on Walton Street - Cynthia MacDougall Revitalizing George Street: The Ward's Lessons - Alina Chatterjee and Derek Ballantyne Taking Care of Business in the Ward -  Ellen Scheinberg  'A Magnificent Dome': The Great University Avenue Synagogue - Jack Lipinsky Reading the Ward: The Inevitability of Loss - Kim Storey and James Brown Toronto's First Little Italy - John Lorinc The Elizabeth Street Playground, Revisited - Bruce Kidd Divided Loyalties - Sandra Shaul Crowded by Any Measure - John Lorinc A Peddler and His Cart: The Ward's Rag Trade - Deena Nathanson Toronto's Original Tenement: Wineberg Apartments - Richard Dennis Excerpt: Tom Thomson's Diary - Tom Thomson  An Untimely Death - Brian Banks Paper Pushers - Ellen Scheinberg  The BMR's Wake-Up Call - Laurie Monsebraaten Excerpt: Report of the Medical Health Officer ... - Charles J. Hastings Dr. Clarke's Clinic - Thelma Wheatley Slum-Free: The Suburban Ideal - Richard Harris The Glionna Clan and Toronto's First Little Italy - John E. Zucchi 'The Hipp' - Michael Posner Before Yorkville - John Lorinc Sex Work and the Ward's Bachelor Society - Elise Chenier Public Baths: Schvitzing on Centre Avenue - Ellen Scheinberg The Health Advocates: McKeown on Hastings - John Lorinc Remembering Toronto's First Chinatown - Kristyn Wong-Tam Tabula Rasa - Mark Kingwell Unrealized Renewal - J. David Hulchanski A Short History of the 'Civic Square' Expropriation - John Lorinc Storytelling is Part of the Story - Tatum Taylor How We Think About What (Little) Survives - Patrick Cummins Institutional Memory - Scott James & Victor Russell Alternative Histories - Michael McClelland

  • Auteur:
    Smith, A.J.M., Gnarowski, Michael, Roberts, Charles G. D., Polk, James
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    Voyageur Classics is a series of new versions of Canadian classics, with added material and special introductions. In this bundle we find two classic works of the art of the Canadian essay. Charles G.D. Roberts was a distinguished writer of his time who published more than forty volumes of poetry, romance fiction, and nature writing – making him one of the most popular writers of his time. He pioneered the animal story in which he went beyond surface elements of nature and endowed his animal "characters" with qualities of feeling and intelligence that brought them closer to their human cousins. Roberts’ career as a writer transcended his Canadian roots and he was internationally known and popular in America and England. Arthur James Marshall Smith – prize-winning poet, essayist, influential anthologist, and critic – died in 1980. His last book, The Classic Shade: Selected Poems, on which Selected Writings is based, stands as his final intention in the world of literature. To this long out of print book the editor has added original material by Smith in which he defined and advanced modernism in Canadian writing. Includes Selected Writings, A.J.M. Smith The Kindred of the Wild

  • Auteur:
    Smith, Barbara, McClung, Nellie
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    Although her name today is synonymous with the women’s suffrage movement in Canada, Nellie McClung’s long and varied career covered several fields—from social activist to elected politician, from novelist to journalist. McClung was instrumental in Canadian women gaining the right to vote before their British and American counterparts—2016 marks the one-hundred-year anniversary of women’s suffrage in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan—and in women being recognized as persons eligible to sit in the Senate. McClung was a household name by the time she was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta in 1921, a post she held for five years.When she settled on Vancouver Island in 1932, McClung was a highly esteemed public figure who had not only changed Canada’s political landscape and influenced women’s rights worldwide but had also raised five children and written a dozen best-selling books. From her beloved Island home, Lantern Lane, McClung continued to speak out against social injustice and inequality. In the late 1930s, she began to write a syndicated weekly newspaper column that served as social commentary for the years leading up to World War II. The Valiant Nellie McClung highlights a selection of those columns—covering themes as grave as war, as fundamental as the strength of the family unit, and as whimsical as the pleasure of gardening—and offers a unique reflection of our country’s history and an uncanny resonance today.

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