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  • Auteur:
    Cooper, Afua
    Sommaire:

    Writer, historian and poet Afua Cooper tells the astonishing story of Marie-Joseph Angélique, a slave woman convicted of starting a fire that destroyed a large part of Montréal in April 1734 and condemned to die a brutal death. In a powerful retelling of Angélique's story--now supported by archival illustrations--Cooper builds on 15 years of research to shed new light on a rebellious Portuguese-born black woman who refused to accept her indentured servitude. At the same time, Cooper completely demolishes the myth of a benign, slave-free Canada, revealing a damning 200- year-old record of legally and culturally endorsed slavery.

  • Auteur:
    Bacon, John U.
    Sommaire:

    In 1917 a ship laden with the most explosives ever packed on a vessel sailed out of Brooklyn's harbor for the battlegrounds of World War I; when it stopped in Halifax, Nova Scotia, an extraordinary disaster took place: the largest man-made detonation prior to Hiroshima.

  • Auteur:
    Figes, Orlando
    Sommaire:

    Nearly all of civilization's great advances have come when people, ideas, and artistic creations circulate freely between nations. Orlando Figes offers the first international history of European culture.

  • Auteur:
    Le Glaunec, Jean-Pierre, Kaplansky, Jonathan
    Sommaire:

    This book tells the story of the Battle of Vertières, fought in 1803 between indigenous Haitian forces under the leadership of Jean-Jacques Dessalines and a French expeditionary army commanded by Napoleon. The battle marked the culmination of a thirteen-year revolutionary struggle to end slavery and the dawn of an independent Haiti. Yet despite its pivotal importance to the history of Haiti, France, and the Americas, the Battle of Vertières has been struck from the record. The Cry of Vertières is the first book-length study of the battle, drawing from an array of sources including military correspondence, Haitian literature, art, and popular music. The event itself is recounted in vivid detail: it is a dramatic story of a volunteer army of former slaves, seeking the promises of freedom and citizenship held out by the revolution, defeating a colonial power determined to re-enslave them. The book also examines why the history of the battle has been suppressed in France - an act of erasure of a humiliating defeat - and why it remains fragile even in Haiti. Jean-Pierre Le Glaunec explains that today Vertières is both a key lieu de mémoire that embodies reconciliation, pride, and strength for the Haitian people, and a figure of speech exploited by politicians to reinforce their power. Describing a decisive yet largely forgotten moment in the revolutionary history of the Americas, The Cry of Vertières makes an essential contribution to the complex subjects of race, memory, colonialism, and cultural nationalism in present-day France and Haiti.

  • Auteur:
    Anderson, Becca
    Sommaire:

    From the first recorded writer to current bestsellers, Becca Anderson takes us through time and highlights women who have left their mark on the literary world.

  • Auteur:
    Koppel, Lily
    Sommaire:

    As America's Mercury Seven astronauts were launched on death-defying missions, TV cameras focused on the brave smiles of their young wives. Overnight, these women were transformed from military spouses into American royalty. Together they formed the Astronaut Wives Club.

  • Auteur:
    Villeneuve, Hubert
    Sommaire:

    Fred C. Schwarz (1913–2009) was an Australian-born medical doctor and evangelical preacher who settled in the United States in the early 1950s, where he founded the Christian Anti-Communism Crusade. His work as an anticommunist educator spanned five decades; his campaigns attracted large crowds, strengthened grassroots conservatism, and influenced political leaders. By the late 1950s, the Crusade had become one of the most important conservative organizations in America, turning numerous citizens into lifelong right-wing militants.In Teaching AnticommunismHubert Villeneuve sheds light on Schwarz's fascinating career and organization, which left a distinct mark on the United States and was also active internationally. Cold War anticommunism in the US consisted of more than the House Un-American Activities Committee and the campaign led by Senator Joseph McCarthy. Villeneuve shows that, by the early 1960s, Schwarz's Crusade was an integral part of a burgeoning American anticommunist subculture that united grassroots conservatives of all stripes. Its influence continued, paving the way for the development of the "New Right" that began in the 1970s. In addition to exploring the life and work of Schwarz, the book highlights the transnational dimension of US conservatism by outlining the Crusade's role in worldwide anticommunist networks that operated throughout the Cold War.Packed with unnerving evidence but leavened with humorous anecdotes and insights into a mercurial figure, Teaching Anticommunismprovides a unique perspective on the evolution of the contemporary American right wing and its global connections.

  • Auteur:
    Guba Jr, David A.
    Sommaire:

    Despite having the highest rates of cannabis use in the continent, France enforces the most repressive laws against the drug in all of Europe. Perhaps surprisingly, France was once the epicentre of a global movement to medicalize cannabis, specifically hashish, in the treatment of disease. In Taming Cannabis David Guba examines how nineteenth-century French authorities routinely blamed hashish consumption, especially among Muslim North Africans, for behaviour deemed violent and threatening to the social order. This association of hashish with violence became the primary impetus for French pharmacists and physicians to tame the drug and deploy it in the homeopathic treatment of mental illness and epidemic disease during the 1830s and 1840s. Initially heralded as a wonder drug capable of curing insanity, cholera, and the plague, hashish was deemed ineffective against these diseases and fell out of repute by the middle 1850s. The association between hashish and Muslim violence, however, remained and became codified in French colonial medicine and law by the 1860s: authorities framed hashish as a significant cause of mental illness, violence, and anti-state resistance among indigenous Algerians. As the French government looks to reform the nation's drug laws to address the rise in drug-related incarceration and the growing popular demand for cannabis legalization, Taming Cannabis provides a timely and fascinating exploration of the largely untold and living history of cannabis in colonial France.

  • Auteur:
    Horner, Dan
    Sommaire:

    The 1840s were a period of rapid growth and social conflict in Montreal. The city's public life was marked by a series of labour conflicts and bloody sectarian riots; at the same time, the ways that elites wielded power and ordinary people engaged in the political process were changing, particularly in public space. In Taking to the Streets Dan Horner examines how the urban environment became a vital and contentious political site during the tumultuous period from the end of the 1837-38 rebellions to the burning of Parliament in 1849. Employing a close reading of newspaper and judicial archives, he looks at a broad range of collective crowd experiences, including riots, labour demonstrations, religious processions, and parades. By examining how crowd events were used both to assert claims of political authority and to challenge their legitimacy, Horner charts the development of a contentious democratic political culture in British North America. Taking to the Streets is an important contribution to the political and urban history of pre-Confederation Canada and a timely reminder of how Montrealers from all walks of life have always used the streets to build community and make their voices heard.

  • Auteur:
    Hurt, Charles
    Sommaire:

    Learn why President Trump is the ideal changemaker that can put an end to America's uncontrollable and corrupt system of government ruled by special interest.

  • Auteur:
    Kendi, Ibram X., Reynolds, Jason
    Sommaire:

    Race has always been used to gain and keep power, creating dynamics that separate and silence. This exploration reveals the history of racism in America and inspires hope for an antiracist future.

  • Auteur:
    Kendi, Ibram X., Reynolds, Jason
    Sommaire:

    Race has always been used to gain and keep power, creating dynamics that separate and silence. This exploration reveals the history of racism in America and inspires hope for an antiracist future.

  • Auteur:
    Munck, Ronaldo
    Sommaire:

    Social movements are a key feature of the political and social landscape of Latin America. Ronaldo Munck explores their full range, emanating from different sections of Latin American society and motivated by many different concerns, including worker organizations, peasant and land reform movements, Indigenous groups, women's movements, and environmental groups. Although the mosaic of interlocking and connected issues and rights presents a complex map of social concerns and potentially a fragmented political force, these movements are likely to be at the centre of any future progressive politics in Latin America. As a result, they require careful understanding and a more nuanced theoretical approach. Drawing on insights from Latin American approaches to social movement theory, the book offers a distinctive contribution to social movement literature. The text incorporates detailed case studies and a methodological appendix for students wishing to develop their own research agendas in the field.

  • Auteur:
    Dye, Paul
    Sommaire:

    Paul Dye, NASA's longest-serving Flight Director, examines the split-second decisions that the directors and astronauts were forced to make in a field where mistakes are unthinkable, where errors led to the loss of national resources, and more importantly, one's crew.

  • Auteur:
    Ball, Simon
    Sommaire:

    As John le Carré's fictional intelligence men admit, it was the case histories - constructed narratives serving shifting agendas - that shaped the British intelligence machine, rather than their personal experience of secret operations.Secret Historydemonstrates that a critical scrutiny of internal "after action" assessments of intelligence prepared by British officials provides an invaluable and original perspective on the emergence of British intelligence culture over a period stretching from the First World War to the early Cold War. The historical record reflects personal value judgments about what qualified as effective techniques and organization, and even who could rightfully be called an intelligence officer. The history of intelligence thus became a powerful form of self-reinforcing cultural capital.Shining an intense light on the history of Britain's intelligence organizations, Secret Historyexcavates how contemporary myths, misperceptions, and misunderstandings were captured and how they affected the development of British intelligence and the state.

  • Auteur:
    Chambers, Veronica
    Sommaire:

    Before they were activists, they were just like you and me. From Frederick Douglass to Malala Yousafzai, Joan of Arc to John Lewis, these remarkable figures show us what it means to take a stand and say no to injustice, proving that any one person has the power to change the world.

  • Auteur:
    Bryant, Mark
    Sommaire:

    The rise to power of Françoise d'Aubigné, Marquise de Maintenon (1635-1719), a queen in all but name, was nothing short of extraordinary. Born into poverty and ignominy, she used her intellect, charisma, and connections to join the ranks of fashionable society, eventually establishing herself at the French court as governess to the legitimized children of Louis XIV. Her relationship with the Sun King gradually flourished, and after the death of the queen in 1683 the couple secretly married. Although their marriage was never made public, Maintenon came to wield unparalleled influence as Louis XIV's closest confidante and most trusted political adviser. The aging king required her daily presence in governmental meetings and relied on her for advice on crown appointments, state business, and policy making. Her modest suite of apartments at Versailles became the heart of the court and she was pursued by officials and dignitaries, popes and princes from across Europe, all anxious to appropriate her influence. She used her expansive social network to intervene in a range of political, religious, and royal family affairs, but not always with the king's knowledge, and her successes were often outweighed by controversy and failure. In Queen of Versailles Mark Bryant explores the remarkable life and court career of Madame de Maintenon. A study in queenship, it reveals how the dynamics of power and gender operated within the realms of early modern high politics, church-state affairs, and international relations while providing unique insights into the Sun King and his court.

  • Auteur:
    Belton, Catherine
    Sommaire:

    "This riveting, immaculately researched book is arguably the best single volume written about Putin, the people around him and perhaps even about contemporary Russia itself in the past three decades." —Peter Frankopan, Financial Times Interference in American elections. The sponsorship of extremist politics in Europe. War in Ukraine. In recent years, Vladimir Putin's Russia has waged a concerted campaign to expand its influence and undermine Western institutions. But how and why did all this come about, and who has orchestrated it? In Putin's People , the investigative journalist and former Moscow correspondent Catherine Belton reveals the untold story of how Vladimir Putin and the small group of KGB men surrounding him rose to power and looted their country. Delving deep into the workings of Putin's Kremlin, Belton accesses key inside players to reveal how Putin replaced the freewheeling tycoons of the Yeltsin era with a new generation of loyal oligarchs, who in turn subverted Russia's economy and legal system and extended the Kremlin's reach into the United States and Europe. The result is a chilling and revelatory exposé of the KGB's revanche—a story that begins in the murk of the Soviet collapse, when networks of operatives were able to siphon billions of dollars out of state enterprises and move their spoils into the West. Putin and his allies subsequently completed the agenda, reasserting Russian power while taking control of the economy for themselves, suppressing independent voices, and launching covert influence operations abroad. Ranging from Moscow and London to Switzerland and Brooklyn's Brighton Beach—and assembling a colorful cast of characters to match— Putin's People is the definitive account of how hopes for the new Russia went astray, with stark consequences for its inhabitants and, increasingly, the world. A Macmillan Audio production from Farrar, Straus and Giroux

  • Auteur:
    Sabbadini, Lorenzo
    Sommaire:

    The concept of self-ownership was first articulated in anglophone political thought in the decades between the outbreak of the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. This book traces the emergence and evolution of self-ownership over the course of this period, culminating in a reinterpretation of John Locke's celebrated but widely misunderstood idea that "every Man has a Property in his own Person." Often viewed through the prism of libertarian political thought, self-ownership has its roots in the neo-Roman or republican concept of liberty as freedom from dependence on the will of another. As Lorenzo Sabbadini reveals, seventeenth-century writers believed that the attainment of this status required not only a specific kind of constitution but a particular distribution of property as well. Many regarded the protection of private property as constitutive of liberty, and it is in this context that the vocabulary of self-ownership emerged. Others expressed anxieties about the corrupting effects of excessive concentrations of wealth or even the institution of private property itself. Bringing together canonical republican writers such as John Milton and James Harrington, lesser-known pamphleteers, and Locke, a theorist generally regarded as being at odds with neo-Roman thought, Property, Liberty, and Self-Ownership in Seventeenth-Century England is a bold, innovative study of some of the most influential concepts to emerge from this groundbreaking period of British history.

  • Auteur:
    Rein, Raanan
    Sommaire:

    Juan Perón's decade-long regime, from 1946 to 1955, is often presented as Nazi-fascist and antisemitic – claims that are strongly rooted in Argentina's collective unconscious and popular culture. Challenging this widely held view, Raanan Rein asserts that there was greater Jewish support for Perón than previously believed, and that fewer antisemitic incidents took place in Argentina during Perón's rule than during any other period in the twentieth century. Recovering the silenced voices of Jewish Argentines who supported Peronism from the beginning, Populism and Ethnicity is a historical, sociological, and political analysis that describes the many positive changes experienced by the Jewish community as a direct result of Perón's presidencies. Perón and his wife Eva gave numerous speeches denouncing antisemitism, and Perón's Argentina was the first Latin American country to open an embassy in the newly established State of Israel. Arguing that no president before Perón so unambiguously rejected discrimination against Jews, Rein shows that many Jews secured more important posts in government in the 1940s and 1950s than in previous years, among them members of the Argentine Jewish Organization, which became a section of the ruling Peronist party. Deconstructing the myth of antisemitism during Perón's regime, Populism and Ethnicity looks deep into the heart of international memory for the truth behind Jewish-Argentine relations.

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