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Indigenous materials

  • Auteur:
    Bouchard, David
    Sommaire:

    This collection of lyrical poems and songs from bestselling author David Bouchard gives a voice to important figures in Métis history from the 17th century to the present day.

  • Auteur:
    Friesen, Angnakuluk
    Sommaire:

    The northern lights shine, women gather to eat raw caribou meat and everyone could be family in this ode to small-town life in Nunavut, written in English and Inuktitut. Sisters Angnakuluk Friesen and Ippiksaut Friesen collaborate on this story about what it’s like to grow up in an Inuit community in Nunavut. Every line about the hometown in this book will have readers thinking about what makes their own hometowns unique. With strong social studies curriculum connections, Kisimi Taimaippaktut Angirrarijarani / ᑭᓯᒥ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑉᐸᒃᑐᑦ ᐊᖏᕐᕋᕆᔭᕋᓂ / Only in My Hometown introduces young readers to life in the Canadian North, as well as the Inuit language and culture. Angnakuluk’s simple text, translated into Inuktitut and written out in syllabics and transliterated roman characters, is complemented by Ippiksaut’s warm paintings of their shared hometown.

  • Auteur:
    Wagamese, Richard
    Sommaire:

    This book draws from the foundational teachings of Ojibway tradition, the Grandfather Teachings. Focusing specifically on the lessons of humility, respect, and courage, the volume invites readers to unite in ceremony to heal themselves and bring harmony to their lives and communities.

  • Auteur:
    Bouchard, David
    Sommaire:

    Nokum Is My Teacher is the poetic story of a young aboriginal boy, posing questions to his grandmother, his "Nokum", about the wider world beyond the familiarity of their home and community. Through a series of questions, Nokum guides her grandson towards an understanding of his need to fit into and learn more about this large world beyond the reserve. Nokum offers her grandson a vision of a world he can enter through imagination and reading, while retaining respect for the ways of his people. By the conclusion of the book, the young grandson has learned many new ideas from his grandmother and discovered his own wisdom in dealing with the changes in his life.

  • Auteur:
    Belcourt, Billy-Ray
    Sommaire:

    In the follow-up to his Griffin Poetry Prize-winning collection, This Wound is a World, Billy-Ray Belcourt aims more of an anthropological eye at the contours of NDN and queer social worlds to spot the much that is left unsaid when we look only to the mainstream media. In this genre-bending work, Belcourt employs poetry, poetics, prose, and textual art to illuminate the rogue possibility bubbling up everywhere NDNs are. Part One examines the rhythms of everyday life, which include the terrible beauty of the reserve, the afterlives of history, and the grammar of anal sex. Part Two experiments with form and practice, putting to use, for example, a mode of documentary poetics that unearths the logics that make and unmake texts like Treaty 8. NDN Coping Mechanisms: Notes from the Field emerges out of a form of auto/ethnographic sensibility that is at turns campy and playful, jarring and candid, displaying, once again, the writer's extraordinary craft, guile, audacity, and the sheer dexterity of his imagination.

  • Auteur:
    Bouvier, Rita E.
    Sommaire:

    Rita Bouvier's third collection of poetry is a response to the highs and lows of life and represents an attempt at restoring order through embracing others, reconciling the traumas caused by the deep scars of history, and soaring beyond life's awkward and painful moments in order to live joyfully. Inspired by the metaphor of a voyageur sustained by song on his journeys up and down the rivers of Northwest Saskatchewan, these "songs for the seasons" draw heavily on images from nature as well as the joys, heartaches and transgressions Bouvier has witnessed and experienced as a Métis woman. Using imagery strongly connected to the natural environment, Bouvier evokes earth's regeneration through the seasons as inspiration for moving forward.

  • Auteur:
    Dorion, Leah
    Sommaire:

    Leah Marie Dorion’s My First Métis Lobstick takes young readers back to Canada’s fur trade era by focusing on a Métis family’s preparations for a lobstick celebration and feast in the boreal forest. Through the eyes of a young boy, we see how important lobstick making and ceremony was to the Métis community. From the Great Lakes to the present-day Northwest Territories, lobstick poles—important cultural and geographical markers, which merged Cree, Ojibway, and French-Canadian traditions—dotted the landscape of our great northern boreal forest. This little known aspect of Métis history vividly comes to life through Leah Marie Dorion’s crisp prose and stunning gallery-quality artwork.

  • Auteur:
    Boyer, Yvonne
    Sommaire:

    Continuing the theme of social determinants of health, this book is an historical examination of Canadian legal regimes and the negative impact they have had on the health of Aboriginal peoples. Everything from the early ban on traditional practices to the constitutional division of powers is examined (including who is responsible for off-reserve Indians under the Constitution). The author argues there is a clear connection between the health of individuals and the legal regime under which they live, and that our legal regime is one of the determinants of health. She contrasts the state of Aboriginal health in pre-contact days with their health today. The book provides comprehensive reviews of both health statistical data, historical practices aimed at Aboriginal peoples, and an analysis of legal principles that have developed in Canadian law as it applies to Aboriginal peoples. It outlines how commitments made by treaty and Supreme Court of Canada rulings on Aboriginal rights, the duty to consult, and the special constitutional status of Aboriginal peoples can be used to advance the health of Aboriginal peoples. The book concludes with a practical framework for the reconciliation of Aboriginal health and healing practices within Canadian society.

  • Auteur:
    Rice, Waubgeshig, Merasty, Billy
    Sommaire:

    A daring post-apocalyptic novel from a powerful rising literary voice. With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow. The community leadership loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision. Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn.

  • Auteur:
    MacLeod, Elizabeth
    Sommaire:

    On a cold and windy April day in 1907, Tom Longboat beat a crowd of top runners to win the famous Boston Marathon. His exhilarating, record-breaking performances earned him legions of fans in Canada and around the world. But there is more to his story than being a famous athlete. Tom volunteered and bravely served in WWI. He was dedicated to his family and community. Tom didn't always win, but he always worked hard with his head held high. Grades 2-4 and older readers.

  • Auteur:
    Caron, Ken, Caron, Angela
    Sommaire:

    Manny's Memories, by author Ken Caron with his daughter Angela Caron, introduces us to the Métis community of Round Prairie, Saskatchewan through the eyes of a young boy growing up in the 1940s. Manny shares his boyhood memories of the once vibrant community not too far from Saskatoon's city limits. Though rural life at the time called for hard work, self-sufficiency, and generosity, there was always time to have fun and to enjoy being a young Métis boy. Artist Donna Lee Dumont's visual expression of Manny's Memories helps us see the world as Ken, called "Manny" in his youth, remembers it. Norman Fleury's accompanying Michif translation and narration returns to the language which Manny so often heard as a boy. Manny's Memories leaves us with a rare and satisfying glimpse of life not so long ago.

  • Auteur:
    Van Camp, Richard, Gray Smith, Monique
    Sommaire:

    Lucy and Lola are 11-year-old twins who are heading to Gabriola Island, BC, to spend the summer with their Kookum (grandmother) while their mother studies for the bar exam. During their time with Kookum, the girls begin to learn about her experiences in being sent -- and having to send their mother -- to Residential school. Ultimately, they discover what it means to be intergenerational survivors.

  • Auteur:
    Nicholson, Hope
    Sommaire:

    Love Beyond Body, Space, and Time is an anthology of science fiction and urban fantasy stories starring First Nations and Metis characters with a LGBT and two-spirit theme.

  • Auteur:
    Kermoal, Nathalie, 1964-, Altamirano-Jiménez, Isabel
    Sommaire:

    An extensive body of literature on Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing has been written since the 1980s. This research has for the most part been conducted by scholars operating within Western epistemological frameworks that tend not only to deny the subjectivity of knowledge but also to privilege masculine authority. As a result, the information gathered predominantly reflects the types of knowledge traditionally held by men, yielding a perspective that is at once gendered and incomplete. Even those academics, communities, and governments interested in consulting with Indigenous peoples for the purposes of planning, monitoring, and managing land use have largely ignored the knowledge traditionally produced, preserved, and transmitted by Indigenous women. While this omission reflects patriarchal assumptions, it may also be the result of the reductionist tendencies of researchers, who have attempted to organize Indigenous knowledge so as to align it with Western scientific categories, and of policy makers, who have sought to deploy such knowledge in the service of external priorities. Such efforts to apply Indigenous knowledge have had the effect of abstracting this knowledge from place as well as from the world view and community--and by extension the gender--to which it is inextricably connected. Living on the Land examines how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism have shaped the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowers and producers of knowledge. From a variety of methodological perspectives, contributors to the volume explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women's knowledge, its rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and its inseparability from land and landscape. From the reconstruction of cultural and ecological heritage by Naskapi women in Québec to the medical expertise of Métis women in western Canada to the mapping and securing of land rights in Nicaragua, Living on the Land focuses on the integral role of women as stewards of the land and governors of the community. Together, these contributions point to a distinctive set of challenges and possibilities for Indigenous women and their communities.

  • Auteur:
    Van Camp, Richard
    Sommaire:

    Celebrating the joy babies bring into the world.

  • Auteur:
    Bird, Joseph
    Sommaire:

    He had just turned seventeen, but Joey Bird had been serving time off and on since he was thirteen, arrested for assault, assault with a weapon, assault against a police officer, and breach of conditions. Living in Winnipeg, young Joey had survived being initiated into a gang against his will, being homeless and sleeping outside in all kinds of weather, and feeling the rejection of his family, friends and community. But nothing could have prepared him for the moment when his friend was shot in the head and killed while sitting just centimeters away from him.

  • Auteur:
    Isluanik, Henry
    Sommaire:

    Henry Isluanik retells the Kiviuq legend, a version passed on to him by his mother, of a courageous hunter who was swept out to sea during a storm and who spent many years trying to find his way back home.

  • Auteur:
    Lewis, Marion
    Sommaire:

    The legend of Kaugjagjuk--a mistreated orphan who gains the strength to stand up for himself with a little help from the Man of the Moon--is a traditional Inuit tale told throughout the Arctic.

    Re-imagined for modern audiences by emerging Inuit writer Marion Lewis, and brought to life by Kim Smith's beautiful illustrations, this version of the Kaugjagjuk story gives young readers a chance to experience this traditional tale that has been carefully passed from storyteller to storyteller for generations.

  • Auteur:
    Christopher, Neil
    Sommaire:

    Each volume in the Kappianaqtut series provides readers with an in-depth academic examination of two mythological creatures from Inuit mythology. The series examines Inuit myths from an ethnographic perspective and fosters discussion on the variations and multiple representations of the myths and creatures in question. This volume, which explores the giants of the North and the mother of the sea mammals, has been fully revised and updated.

  • Auteur:
    Ward, Kelly
    Sommaire:

    Join Kalla as he visits the circus and discovers the many fun-filled ways that numbers, shapes, and patterns exist in the world around us.

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