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Essays

  • Author:
    Gray, Peter
    Summary:

    Psychologist Peter Gray suggests that it's time to stop asking what's wrong with our children, and start asking what's wrong with the system.

  • Author:
    Steves, Rick
    Summary:

    Rick Steves knows Europe inside and out, and has made a career of inspiring people to explore, connect, and step outside their comfort zones. With a brand-new, original introduction from Rick reflecting on his decades of travel, this book features 100 of the best stories published throughout his career.

  • Author:
    Barnetson, Bob, 1970-, McDonald, Shirley Ann, 1953-
    Summary:

    Farm workers are the faceless multitudes driving agriculture production. Many workers--men, women, and children--are injured and even killed at work. In nine essays, contributors to Farm Workers in Western Canada look at the origin, work conditions, and precarious lives of farm workers in terms of larger historical forces such as colonialism, land rights, and racism. They also examine how the rights and privileges of farm workers, including seasonal and temporary foreign workers, conflict with those of their employers, and reveal the barriers many face by being excluded from most statutory employment laws, sometimes in violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Scholars in the disciplines of sociology, Canadian history, law, and rural and labour studies, as well as policy makers, farmers, farm workers, and activists will benefit from reading Farm Workers in Western Canada.

  • Author:
    Momaday, N. Scott
    Summary:

    Poet N. Scott Momaday reflects on his native ground and its influence on his people. He recalls stories of his childhood passed down through generations that reveal a profound, sacred connection to the American landscape and a reverence for the natural world, offering both homage and a warning.

  • Author:
    Stern, Fritz Richard
    Summary:

    In this collection of ten essays, Fritz Stern - widely regarded as America's foremost authority on modern Germany - illustrates the 'German drama,' the story of a country whose history has comprised the promise of twentieth-century Europe and its nemesis, the greatness and the squandering of achievement, the dreams of peace and the delusions of power. Germany remains a country of immense and central complexity, where even today the past remains bitterly controversial and its interpretation uniquely important for the shaping of a national future.

  • Author:
    Jaarsma, Ada S., Dobson, Kit, Cawsey, Kathy, Jones, Rachel, Kinaschuk, Kyle, Mitra, Namrata, Obrecht, Guy, Pettinen, Katja K., Rothberger, Kaitlin, Shipley, Ely, Shuster, Martin
    Summary:

    Dissonant Methods is an innovative collection that probes how, by approaching teaching creatively, postsecondary instructors can resist the constrictions of neoliberalism. Based on the foundations of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, whereby educators are asked to explore teaching as scholarship, these essays offer concrete and practical meditations on resistant and sustainable teaching. The contributors seek to undermine forms of oppression frequently found in higher education, and instead advance a vision of the university that upholds ideals such as critical thinking, creativity, and inclusivity. Essential reading for faculty and graduate students in the humanities, Dissonant Methods offers urgent, galvanizing ideas for anyone currently teaching in a college or university.

    Contributors: Kathy Cawsey, Kit Dobson, Ada S. Jaarsma, Rachel Jones, Kyle Kinaschuk, Namrata Mitra, Guy Obrecht, Katja K. Pettinen, Kaitlin Rothberger, Ely Shipley, Martin Shuster

  • Author:
    Ellis, Jim, 1964-
    Summary:

    How have our interactions with animals shaped Calgary? What can we do to ensure that humans and animals in the city continue to co-exist, and even flourish together? This wide-ranging book explores the ways that animals inhabit our city, our lives and our imaginations. Essays from animal historians, wildlife specialists, artists and writers address key issues such as human-wildlife interactions, livestock in the city, and animal performers at the Calgary Stampede. Contributions from some of Calgary's iconic arts institutions, including One Yellow Rabbit Performance Theatre, Decidedly Jazz Danceworks, and the Glenbow Museum, demonstrate how animals continue to be a source of inspiration and exploration for fashion, art, dance and theatre. The full-colour volume is beautifully illustrated throughout with archival images, wildlife photography, documentary and production stills, and original artwork.

  • Author:
    Nelson, Maggie
    Summary:

    Maggie Nelson presents 240 short pieces, all on the color blue, that offer surprising insights into the emotional depths that make us most human.

  • Author:
    Ratzlaff, Lloyd
    Summary:

    In a series of reflections focused on his uneducated yet hard-working Mennonite family and touching on childhood exploits from shoplifting and go-kart racing to the juvenile fear of dying (which spontaneously arises during the rehearsal for an elementary school Christmas concert), Lloyd Ratzlaff takes readers on a journey from youth to philosophical maturity. Combining elegy and joyful nostalgia in a series of poetic essays, Ratzlaff recounts the struggles of his youth before analyzing his first marriage, his time at seminary school and as a minister, and examining life as the parent of adult children and closest confidante of a terminally ill friend.

  • Author:
    Myers, Christina, Cameron, Layla, Richards, Rabbit, Blais, Simone, Jefferson, Jo, Bannerjee, Rohini, Root, Cate, Quon, Sally, Manrell, Tracy, Arbo, Jen, Jones, Lynne, Boon, Sonja, Blair, Jessie, van Mil, Heather, Stocks, Cassie, Pownall, Jennifer, Many, Caroline, Ball, Shadoe, Scriver, Ama, Weicker, Katy, Allan, Emily, Jones, Heather M., Hansell, Andrea, Cook, Elizabeth, Mandarano, Tara, Alexander, Susan
    Summary:

    Pop culture stereotypes, shopping frustrations, fat jokes, and misconceptions about health are all ways society systemically rejects large bodies. BIG is a collection of personal and intimate experiences of plus size women, non-binary and trans people in a society obsessed with thinness. Revealing insights that are both funny and traumatic, surprising and challenging, familiar and unexpected, 26 writers explore themes as diverse as self perception, body image, fashion, fat activism, food, sexuality, diet culture, motherhood and more. These stories offer a closer look at what it means to navigate a world designed to fit bodies of a certain size (sometimes literally) and, in turn, invites readers to ask questions about—and ultimately reconsider—our collective and individual obsession with women’s bodies.

    Contributors include Dr. Rohini Bannerjee, Amanda Scriver, Cassie Stocks, Jo Jefferson, Layla Cameron, Rabbit Richards, Sonja Boon, Simone Blais, Tracy Manrell and other writers from across Canada, the US, and the UK.

  • Author:
    Crewe, Lesley
    Summary:

    For the first time, bestselling novelist, columnist, and humorist Lesley Crewe's finest newspaper columns are collected in one place. Not merely razor sharp, Lesley's wit is also ocean wide, taking in everything from the humiliations of breast pumping to the indignities of aging, from the frantic excess of holiday preparations to the homey irritations of a long marriage. As precise in her observations as Jane Austen and as fractious on occasion as Oscar the Grouch, Crewe also has a sweet, tender centre, taking us from a hearty laugh to a good cry in a single paragraph. Readers will relate to Crewe's ache at missing her mom, her nostalgia for her childhood, her frustrations at raising teenagers, and her impatience for terrible parking lot etiquette in equal measure. The book spans sixteen years' worth of columns for The Cape Bretoner Magazine, Cahoots Magazine, and The Chronicle Herald. Are You Kidding Me?! is a side-splitting, heartwarming, Cape Breton-flavoured celebration of the little things.

  • Author:
    Brown, Jennifer S. H.
    Summary:

    In 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the Algonquian communities—who hosted and tolerated the fur traders—and later, the missionaries, anthropologists, and others who found their way into Indigenous lives and territories. The eighteen essays gathered in this book explore Brown’s investigations into the surprising range of interactions among Indigenous people and newcomers as they met or observed one another from a distance, and as they competed, compromised, and rejected or adapted to change. While diverse in their subject matter, the essays have thematic unity in their focus on the old HBC territory and its peoples from the 1600s to the present. More than an anthology, the chapters of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land provide examples of Brown’s exceptional skill in the close study of texts, including oral documents, images, artifacts, and other cultural expressions. The volume as a whole represents the scholarly evolution of one of the leading ethnohistorians in Canada and the United States.

  • Author:
    Albatta, Madeeha Hafez, Bill, Barbara, Ageel, Ghada, Abu Sitta, Salman
    Summary:

    Palestinian refugees in Gaza have lived in camps for five generations, experiencing hardship and uncertainty. In the absence of official histories, oral narratives handed down from generation to generation bear witness to life in Palestine before and after the 1948 Nakba—the catastrophe of dispossession. These narratives maintain traditions, keep alive names of destroyed villages, and record stories of the fight for dignity and freedom. The Women’s Voices from Gaza Series honours women’s unique and underrepresented perspectives on the social, material, and political realities of Palestinian life. In A White Lie, the first volume in this series, Madeeha Hafez Albatta chronicles her life in Gaza and beyond. Among her remarkable achievements was establishing some of the first schools for refugee children in Gaza.

  • Author:
    Jost, Colin
    Summary:

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ; In these hilarious essays, the  Saturday Night Live  head writer and Weekend Update co-anchor learns how to take a beating. “I always wanted to punch his face before I read this book. Now I just want to kick him in the balls.”—Larry David NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY COSMOPOLITAN  If there’s one trait that makes someone well suited to comedy, it’s being able to take a punch—metaphorically and, occasionally, physically.  From growing up in a family of firefighters on Staten Island to commuting three hours a day to high school and “seeing the sights” (like watching a Russian woman throw a stroller off the back of a ferry), to attending Harvard while Facebook was created, Jost shares how he has navigated the world like a slightly smarter Forrest Gump. You’ll also discover things about Jost that will surprise and confuse you, like how Jimmy Buffett saved his life, how Czech teenagers attacked him with potato salad, how an insect laid eggs inside his legs, and how he competed in a twenty-five-man match at WrestleMania (and almost won). You'll go behind the scenes at SNL and Weekend Update (where he's written some of the most memorable sketches and jokes of the past fifteen years). And you’ll experience the life of a touring stand-up comedian—from performing in rural college cafeterias at noon to opening for Dave Chappelle at Radio City Music Hall. For every accomplishment (hosting the Emmys), there is a setback (hosting the Emmys). And for every absurd moment (watching paramedics give CPR to a raccoon), there is an honest, emotional one (recounting his mother’s experience on the scene of the Twin Towers’ collapse on 9/11). Told with a healthy dose of self-deprecation,  A Very Punchable Face  reveals the brilliant mind behind some of the dumbest sketches on television, and lays bare the heart and humor of a hardworking guy—with a face you can’t help but want to punch.

  • Author:
    Charleyboy, Lisa
    Summary:

    Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

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