Main content

Folk tales

  • Author:
    Summary:

    This is Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (Inuit traditional knowledge) in the flesh, co-editor and translator Jaypeetee Arnakak writes in his introduction to this volume of traditional Inuit stories. The underlying events of a story are perfect spots to encode advice, explanations, and landmarks: the medium is the message. Inuit legends and stories are not mere superstitious musings. What they contain is far richer and more profound than what a superficial glance can grasp. This rich volume contains thirty-three versions of traditional stories, transcribed and edited from oral recordings of ten Inuit elders from two High Arctic communities, Arctic Bay and Igloolik.

  • Author:
    Qamaniq, Uvinik, Widermann, Eva, Christopher, Neil
    Summary:

    Experience the exciting world of arctic giants through traditional tales from around Nunavut. Based on elder interviews from more than one hundred years ago, these stories reveal the fearsome giants that once stalked the arctic. From enormous beings strong enough to pick up a walrus with one hand, to massive creatures that towered over mountains and could carry humans on the lace of one boot, these Inuktitut language stories will introduce readers to a vast array of arctic giants.

  • Author:
    Bar-el, Dan
    Summary:

    Libby Gaborchik, a highly unusual fairy, helps Marvin, a poor peasant, win the hand of the beautiful but love-starved Princess Vera.

  • Author:
    Campbell, Maria, Farrell Racette, Sherry
    Summary:

    Stories of the road allowance people are old men's stories, translated by Maria Campbell and given to you in the dialect and rhythm of her village and her father's generation. In the M¿Æis oral tradition, these stories must be said aloud to give life to the voices in village English.

  • Author:
    Yoon, KyungAh
    Summary:

    "Korean Through Folktales consists of four chapters and each centers on a famous Korean folktale. The lessons and values that famous folktales teach are embedded and permeated in various aspects of the Koran culture. Using folktales in the curriculum will provide an engaging way to expose students to a slice of the target culture that native Koreans are naturally exposed to at an early age. Through the selected folktales and various activities offered in the book, students can gain cultural knowledge and insights into traditional and cultural values while they are given linguistic lessons to reinforce their acquired skills and to apply the learned materials in an integrated approach. Korean Through Folktales is designed to accompany 1st-year, 2nd-year, and 3rd-year Korean courses"--BCcampus website.

  • Author:
    Isluanik, Henry
    Summary:

    Henry Isluanik retells the Kiviuq legend, a version passed on to him by his mother, of a courageous hunter who was swept out to sea during a storm and who spent many years trying to find his way back home.

  • Author:
    Lewis, Marion
    Summary:

    The legend of Kaugjagjuk--a mistreated orphan who gains the strength to stand up for himself with a little help from the Man of the Moon--is a traditional Inuit tale told throughout the Arctic.

    Re-imagined for modern audiences by emerging Inuit writer Marion Lewis, and brought to life by Kim Smith's beautiful illustrations, this version of the Kaugjagjuk story gives young readers a chance to experience this traditional tale that has been carefully passed from storyteller to storyteller for generations.

  • Author:
    Christopher, Neil
    Summary:

    Each volume in the Kappianaqtut series provides readers with an in-depth academic examination of two mythological creatures from Inuit mythology. The series examines Inuit myths from an ethnographic perspective and fosters discussion on the variations and multiple representations of the myths and creatures in question. This volume, which explores the giants of the North and the mother of the sea mammals, has been fully revised and updated.

  • Author:
    Christopher, Neil
    Summary:

    Arctic Little Folk introduces young readers to the fascinating, strange, and amusing world of Arctic dwarves, fairies, elves, and gnomes. These tiniest inhabitants of the Arctic tundra are told about in folklore across the Arctic.

  • Author:
    Smith, Barbara
    Summary:

    Known for her series of true ghost stories, Barbara Smith is back, this time with a collection of fictional ghostly tales set in real Alberta locations. So light the fire and prepare to be spooked by these delightfully eerie stories, including: * A young man trying to get home to Edmonton from Fort McMurray has a brush with death when he takes a ride in a phantom van * Three friends having brunch in Red Deer are joined by the ghost of a woman from a time gone by * The angry spirit of a woman killed on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River gets vengeance on the Edmonton man who caused her death * Kindly spirits give two lonely young people in Lethbridge a nudge in the right direction, forever changing their lives for the better * A well-meaning constable in Lloydminster inadvertently tries to help the ghost of a local hermit in his search for the money he was forced to leave behind when he died * Two soulmates, separated at birth, are reunited in death at the Okotoks Erratic * And more.

Subscribe to RSS - Folk tales