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Science

  • Author:
    Shane, Janelle
    Summary:

    AI is everywhere. It powers the autocorrect function of your iPhone, helps Google Translate understand the complexity of language, and decides which of your friends' Facebook posts you most want to see. In the coming years, it'll perform medical diagnoses and drive your car, and maybe even help our authors write the first lines of their novels. But how does it actually work?

  • Author:
    Fonda, Jane
    Summary:

    A call to action from Jane Fonda, one of the most inspiring activists of our time, urging us to wake up to the looming disaster of climate change and equipping us with the tools we need to join her in protest "This is the last possible moment in history when changing course can mean saving lives and species on an unimaginable scale. It's too late for moderation." In the fall of 2019, frustrated with the obvious inaction of politicians and inspired by Greta Thunberg, Naomi Klein, and student climate strikers, Jane Fonda moved to Washington, D.C., to lead weekly climate change demonstrations on Capitol Hill. On October 11, she launched Fire Drill Fridays, and has since led thousands of people in nonviolent civil disobedience, risking arrest to protest for action. In What Can I Do? , Fonda weaves her deeply personal journey as an activist alongside conversations with and speeches by leading climate scientists and inspiring community organizers, and dives deep into the issues, such as water, migration, and human rights, to emphasize what is at stake. Most significantly, Fonda equips us all with the tools we need to join her in protest, so that everyone can work to combat the climate crisis. No stranger to protest, Fonda's life has been famously shaped by activism. And now she is once again galvanizing the public to take to the streets. Many are already aware of the looming disaster of climate change and realize that a moral responsibility rests on our shoulders. In 2019, we saw atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases hit the highest level ever recorded in human history, and our window of opportunity to act is quickly closing. We are facing a climate crisis, but we're also facing an empathy crisis and an inequality crisis; the surge of protests over police violence against black Americans has once again highlighted the links between racism and environmental degradation in our country. It isn't only earth's life-support systems that are unraveling. So too is our social fabric. This is going to take an all-out war on drilling and fracking and deregulation and racism and misogyny and colonialism and despair all at the same time. As Annie Leonard, executive director of Greenpeace USA and Fonda's partner in developing Fire Drill Fridays, has declared, "Change is inevitable; by design, or by disaster." Together, we can commandeer change for the positive—but it will require collective actions taken by social movements on an unprecedented scale. The problems we face now require every one of us to join the fight. The fight for not only our immediate future, but for the future of generations to come. *This audiobook program includes a PDF of photographs and graphs. 100% of the author's net proceeds from What Can I Do ? will go to Greenpeace

  • Author:
    Le Bel, Pauline
    Summary:

    An exhilarating mix of natural history and personal exploration Whale in the Door is a passionate account of a woman’s transformative experience of her adopted home.

    For thousands of years, Howe Sound, an inlet in the Salish Sea provided abundant food, shelter, and stories, for the Squamish Nation. After a century of contamination from pulp mills, a chemical factory, and a copper mine, the Sound, a noisy, stinky, polluted place, contained many biologically dead zones. Marine life was severely diminished. But major efforts by the Squamish Nation, governments, and industry has produced dramatic returns of herring, dolphins, porpoises, orcas, and humpbacks.

    Today, Howe Sound, a spectacular fjord in Vancouver’s backyard, is a popular recreation and tourism destination. The recovery, however, is fragile. The Sound is being inundated with proposals for re-industrialization-a controversial liquid natural gas plant, pipelines, super tankers, a gravel mine on a salmon-bearing estuary, and major residential and commercial developments.

    Pauline Le Bel, a resident of Howe Sound, embarks on a journey of discovery to find out what is special about the Sound, its wild nature and its people, to witness the cultural and spiritual revivals taking place. Her research, her interviews, her travels on the land, the water, the skies of Howe Sound, compel her to abandon antiquated ideas about wilderness and community, and to arrive at a new appreciation for the genius of her home.

    Whale in the Door invites readers into a story of biological resilience as a community struggles to shape a vision for its future.

  • Author:
    Quarmby, Lynne
    Summary:

    Concern about the climate crisis is widespread as humans struggle to navigate life in uncertain times. From the vantage of a schooner full of artists on an adventure in the high Arctic, biologist Lynne Quarmby explains the science that convinced her of an urgent need to act on climate change and recounts how this knowledge - and the fear and panic it elicited - plunged her into unsustainable action, ending in arrests, lawsuits, and a failed electoral campaign on behalf of the Green Party of Canada.Watermelon Snowweaves memoir, microbiology, and artistic antics together with descriptions of a sublime Arctic landscape. At the top of the warming world, Quarmby struggles with burnout and grief while an aerial artist twirls high in the ship's rigging, bearded seals sing mournfully, polar bears prowl, and glaciers crumble into the sea. In a compelling narrative, sorrow and fear are balanced by beauty and wonder. The author's journey back from a life out of balance includes excursions into evolutionary history where her discoveries reveal the heart of human existence. The climate realities are as dark as the Arctic winter, yet this is a book of lightness and generosity. Quarmby's voice, intimate and original, illuminates the science while offering a reminder that much about the human experience is beyond reason.Inspiring and deeply personal, Watermelon Snowis the story of one scientist's rediscovery of what it means to live a good life at a time of increasing desperation about the future.

  • Author:
    Ellis, Jim, 1964-, Calgary Institute for the Humanities
    Summary:

    Water Rites: Reimagining Water in the West brings together artists, activists, conservation groups, and scholars to illuminate the diverse issues surrounding water in Alberta. Examining the human right to water, the effects of resource extraction on Indigenous communities, oil spills, and protest movements, this vital collection explores key water-related issues with a focus on environmental and Indigenous perspectives. It shows how deeply water is tied to human life, not only as a necessary resource, but also as a source of artistic inspiration and as part of our collective consciousness.

  • Author:
    Varol, Ozan O.
    Summary:

    You don't have to be a rocket scientist to think like one. Ozan Varol reveals nine simple strategies from rocket science that you can use to make your own giant leaps in work and life. Those who can tackle complex and unfamiliar problems, without clear guidelines and with the clock ticking, enjoy an extraordinary advantage.

  • Author:
    Debbink, Andrea
    Summary:

    Packed with real-life tales of adventure and practical tools, this handbook is an inspiring guide for the next generation of climate activists, conservationists, and nature lovers.

  • Author:
    Turner, Chris
    Summary:

    A passionate and meticulously researched argument against the Harper government's war on science.
    In this arresting and passionately argued indictment, award-winning journalist Chris Turner argues that Stephen Harper's attack on basic science, science communication, environmental regulations, and the environmental NGO community is the most vicious assault ever waged by a Canadian government on the fundamental principles of the Enlightenment. From the closure of Arctic research stations as oil drilling begins in the High Arctic to slashed research budgets in agriculture, dramatic changes to the nation’s fisheries policy, and the muzzling of government scientists, Harper's government has effectively dismantled Canada's long-standing scientific tradition.
    Drawing on interviews with scientists whose work has been halted by budget cuts and their colleagues in an NGO community increasingly treated as an enemy of the state, The War on Science paints a vivid and damning portrait of a government that has abandoned environmental stewardship and severed a national commitment to the objective truth of basic science as old as Canada itself.

  • Author:
    Hewitt, Ben
    Summary:

    This is the captivating story of a small town coming back to life. Hardwick, Vermont, has jump-started its economy through a local, self-sustaining food system, surviving with its network of community support. 

  • Author:
    Hippel, William von
    Summary:

    Bill von Hippel traces human development through three critical evolutionary inflection points to explain how events in our distant past shape our lives today. From the mundane, such as why we exaggerate, to the surprising, such as why we believe our own lies and why fame and fortune are as likely to bring misery as happiness, the implications are far reaching and extraordinary.

  • Author:
    Mearns, David L.
    Summary:

    David L. Mearns has discovered some of the world's most fascinating and elusive shipwrecks. This book chronicles his most intriguing finds. It describes the extraordinary techniques used, the detailed research and mid-ocean stamina and courage required to find a wreck thousands of feet beneath the sea, as well as the moving human stories that lie behind each of these oceanic tragedies.

  • Author:
    Suzuki, David
    Summary:

    In this extensively revised and enlarged edition of his best-selling book, David Suzuki reflects on the increasingly radical changes in nature and science — from global warming to the science behind mother/baby interactions — and examines what they mean for humankind’s place in the world. The book begins by presenting the concept of people as creatures of the Earth who depend on its gifts of air, water, soil, and sun energy. The author explains how people are genetically programmed to crave the company of other species, and how people suffer enormously when they fail to live in harmony with them. Suzuki analyzes those deep spiritual needs, rooted in nature, that are a crucial component of a loving world. Drawing on his own experiences and those of others who have put their beliefs into action, The Sacred Balance is a powerful, passionate book with concrete suggestions for creating an ecologically sustainable, satisfying, and fair future by rediscovering and addressing humanity’s basic needs.

  • Author:
    Barnatt, Christopher
    Summary:

    The Next Big Thing explores future revolutions that will determine how things are made, who we share the planet with, where resources come from, and the evolution of the human species. Beyond 2030, the way we live today will no longer be sustainable. We will therefore need to develop technologies including 3D printing, synthetic biology and space travel if our civilization is to survive and thrive.

  • Author:
    Robinson, Kim Stanley
    Summary:

    Established in 2025, the purpose of the new organization was simple: To advocate for the world's future generations and to protect all living creatures, present and future. It soon became known as the Ministry for the Future, and this is its story.

  • Author:
    McGilchrist, Iain
    Summary:

    Why is the brain divided? The difference between right and left hemispheres has been puzzled over for centuries. In this book, Iain McGilchrist draws on a vast body of recent brain research, illustrated with case histories, to reveal that the difference is profound - not just this or that function, but two whole, coherent, but incompatible ways of experiencing the world. The left hemisphere is detail oriented, prefers mechanisms to living things, and is inclined to self-interest, where the right hemisphere has greater breadth, flexibility, and generosity. This division helps explain the origins of music and language, and casts new light on the history of philosophy, as well as on some mental illnesses.

  • Author:
    Ward, Jacob
    Summary:

    Journalist Jacob Ward presents an eye-opening narrative journey into the rapidly changing world of artificial intelligence, revealing the dangerous ways AI is exploiting the unconscious habits of our minds and the real threat it poses to humanity.

  • Author:
    Patrick-Goudreau, Colleen
    Summary:

    Colleen Patrick-Goudreau has guided countless individuals through the process of becoming vegan. Now, she shares her insights into why some people stay vegan and others stop. In these pages, Colleen shares her wisdom for managing common challenges and arms readers, both vegan and plant-based, with solutions and strategies for creating a sustainable vegan lifestyle.

  • Author:
    Wohlleben, Peter
    Summary:

    An Instant New York Times Bestseller

    With more than 2 million copies sold worldwide, this beautifully-written book journeys deep into the forest to uncover the fascinating-and surprisingly moving-hidden life of trees.
    "At once romantic and scientific, [Wohlleben's] view of the forest calls on us all to reevaluate our relationships with the plant world." - Daniel Chamovitz, PhD, author of What a Plant Knows
    Are trees social beings? In The Hidden Life of Trees forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.
    After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again.
    Includes a Note From a Forest Scientist, by Dr.Suzanne Simard
    Published in Partnership with the David Suzuki Institute

  • Author:
    Ghosh, Amitav
    Summary:

    Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh examines our inability to grasp the scale and violence of climate change, and asks us to imagine other forms of human existence, a task to which fiction is the best suited of all cultural forms.

  • Author:
    Castonguay, Stéphane
    Summary:

    The Government of Natural Resourcesexplores the development of scientific and technical activity in Quebec from Confederation until the eve of the Second World War. At the turn of the twentieth century, the provincial government created scientific services in geology, forestry, fishery, and agronomy, with the goal of exploiting natural resources and occupying territory. The new services sought to amass a corps of skilled employees to support this mission, readily supplied by universities that were producing their first graduates from recently established technical programs. Scientific and technical personnel are an often quiet presence within the state, but they play an integral role. By tracing the history of mining, logging, hunting, fishing, and agriculture in Quebec, Stéphane Castonguay reveals how territorial and environmental transformations through scientific activity became a tool of government. The production of knowledge about a territory and its natural resources is a key element in power relations, making an active contribution to state formation and the expansion of administrative capacity. The lessons that this thoughtful reconceptualization of resource development offers reach well beyond provincial borders, changing the way we think of science and state power.

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