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Food and drink

  • Author:
    McCarthy, Ed, Ewing-Mulligan, Mary
    Summary:

    The #1 wine book—now updated!  The art of winemaking may be a time-honored tradition dating back thousands of years, but today, wine is trendier and hotter than ever. Now, wine experts and authors Ed McCarthy and Mary Ewing-Mulligan have revised their popular Wine For Dummies to deliver an updated, down-to-earth look at what's in, what's out, and what's new in wine. Wine enthusiasts and novices, raise your glasses! The #1 wine book has been updated! If you're a connoisseur, Wine For Dummies will get you up to speed on what's in and help you take your hobby to the next level. If you're new to the world of wine, it will clue you in on what you've been missing and show you how to get started. It begins with the basic types of wine, how wines are made, and more. Then it gets down to specifics, like navigating restaurant wine lists, deciphering wine labels, dislodging stubborn corks, and so much more. * Includes updated information on wine regions throughout the world, including the changes that have taken place in Chile, Argentina, parts of Eastern Europe, the Mt. Etna region in Sicily, among other wine regions in Italy and California's Sonoma Coast * Covers what's happening in the "Old World" of wine, including France, Italy, and Spain, and gets you up-to-speed on what's hot (and what's not) in the "New World" of Wine, including the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand * Features updated vintage charts and price guidelines * Covers wine bloggers and the use of smartphone apps Wine For Dummies is not just a great resource and reference, it's a good read. It's full-bodied, yet light...rich, yet crisp...robust, yet refreshing....

  • Author:
    McCarthy, Ed, Ewing-Mulligan, Mary, Egan, Maryann
    Summary:

    An all-inclusive, easy-to-use primer to all things wine Want to learn about wine, but don't know where to start? Wine All-In-One For Dummies provides comprehensive information about the basics of wine in one easy-to-understand volume. Combining the bestselling Wine For Dummies with our regional and specific wine titles, this book gives you the guidance you need to understand, purchase, drink and enjoy wine. You'll start at the beginning as you discover how wine is made. From there you'll explore grape varieties and vineyards, read labels and wine lists, and discover all the nuances of tasting wine. You'll see how to successfully store wine and serve it to your guests-and even build up an impressive collection of wine. Plus, you'll find suggestions for perfect food pairings and complete coverage on wines from around the world. * Features wine tasting, serving, storing, collecting, and buying tips, all in a single authoritative volume * Includes information on California wines, as well as other domestic and foreign locations including the US, Canada, France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Greece, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Chile, and Argentina. * Helps you choose the best vintage for your needs * Also covers champagne, sherry, and port wine * Ed McCarthy and Mary Ewing-Mulligan are the authors of seven Dummies books on wine including the bestselling Wine For Dummies, 4th Edition, other contributing authors are recognized wine experts and journalists in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada Whether you're a wine novice or a budding sommelier, Wine All-In-One For Dummies is the one guide you need on your shelf to make your wine experience complete.

  • Author:
    Herz, Rachel
    Summary:

    Why You Eat What You Eat examines the sensory, psychological, neuroscientific, and physiological factors that influence our eating habits. Rachel Herz uncovers the fascinating and surprising facts that affect food consumption: bringing reusable bags to the grocery store encourages us to buy more treats; our beliefs about food affect the number of calories we burn; TV alters how much we eat; and what we see and hear changes how food tastes. Herz reveals useful techniques for managing cravings, such as resisting repeated trips to the buffet table, and how aromas can be used to curb overeating. Why You Eat What You Eat mixes the social with the scientific to uncover how psychology, neurology, and physiology shape our relationship with food and how food alters the relationships we have with ourselves and with one another.

  • Author:
    Luntz, Perry
    Summary:

    Would you like to better appreciate fine distilled spirits? Whiskey & Spirits For Dummies is your complete guide to selecting and enjoying this family of noble beverages, flavor by flavor. From whiskey, rum, and brandy to vodka, gin, and cordials, this handy reference traces the history of distilled spirits, explains how they are made, and shows you how to evaluate, serve, and savor them.  Ever wonder why the Irish spell it “whiskey” and the Scottish “whisky”? This friendly book tells you as it reveals where the first whiskeys — or “dark” spirits — originated and how they came to the United States. It also explores the origins of clear spirits and the different varieties of each. You’ll compare American and European vodkas, see how to make the new and improved all-purpose Martini, and follow the spread of flavored rums across the globe. A slew of sidebars give you fascinating tidbits of information about these spirits. You’ll also discover how to: * Become a sophisticated taster * Shop for the best spirits * Select the right mixers * Use spirits in cooking * Make 10 classic cocktails * Choose and taste cordials and liqueurs * Know the nutrients in one serving of each type of distilled spirit * Present spirits to guests * Set up tasting events at home This thorough guide also features recipes for cooking with spirits, offering menu choices such as entrees, vegetables, and desserts that all include at least one type of spirit. Complete with an appendix of craft distillers across the United States, Whiskey & Spirits For Dummies will give you the knowledge and hands-on guidance you need to become a connoisseur of such greats as fine Scotch, Bourbon, and Cognac in no time!

  • Author:
    Wolke, Robert L.
    Summary:

    Why is red meat red? How do they decaffeinate coffee? Do you wish you understood the science of food but don't want to plow through dry, technical books? In What Einstein Told His Cook, University of Pittsburgh chemistry professor emeritus and award-winning Washington Post food columnist Robert L. Wolke provides reliable and witty explanations for your most burning food questions, while debunking misconceptions and helping you interpret confusing advertising and labeling. A finalist for both the James Beard Foundation and IACP Awards for best food reference, What Einstein Told His Cook engages cooks and chemists alike.

  • Author:
    Freston, Kathy
    Summary:

    Kathy Freston shows listeners how to lean into the veganist life. Effortless weight loss, reversal of disease, environmental responsibility, and spiritual awakening are just a few of the ten profound changes that can be achieved through a gentle switch in food choices.

  • Author:
    Simpson, Sarah
    Summary:

    Uprisings offers practical advice to empower and inspire individuals and community groups interested in growing and eating local grains. Step-by-step instructions on everything you need to know for successful small scale grain production are rounded out by a bushel of case studies demonstrating how to develop a community grain model suitable to any group's unique needs and resources.

  • Author:
    Micallef, Shawn
    Summary:

    What do your Eggs Benedict say about your notions of class? Every weekend, in cities around the world, bleary-eyed diners wait in line to be served overpriced, increasingly outré food by hungover waitstaff. For some, the ritual we call brunch is a beloved pastime; for others, a bedeviling waste of time. But what does its popularity say about shifting attitudes towards social status and leisure? In some ways, brunch and other forms of conspicuous consumption have blinded us to ever-more-precarious employment conditions. For award-winning writer and urbanist Shawn Micallef, brunch is a way to look more closely at the nature of work itself and a catalyst for solidarity among the so-called creative class. Drawing on theories from Thorstein Veblen to Richard Florida, Micallef traces his own journey from the rust belt to a cosmopolitan city where the evolving middle class he joined was oblivious to its own instability and insularity. The Trouble with Brunch is a provocative analysis of foodie obsession and status anxiety, but it's also a call to reset our class consciousness. The real trouble with brunch isn't so much bad service and outsized portions of bacon, it's that brunch could be so much more.   Praise for Shawn Micallef: ‘As Toronto grows into a more mature, more compelling city, a new group of non-academic, street-smart urbanists has emerged to appreciate it – with-it young writers, architects and men and women about town who love big cities and see things in Toronto that most of us miss. Shawn Micallef is one of the sharpest of this sharp-eyed breed.’ – Globe and Mail ‘A smart and intimate guide to the city that makes you feel like an insider from start to finish.’ – Douglas Coupland [on Stroll]

  • Author:
    Crain, Liz.
    Summary:

    At the heart of Portland's red-hot food scene is Toro Bravo, a Spanish-inspired restaurant whose small plates have attracted a fiercely loyal fan base. But to call Toro Bravo a Spanish restaurant doesn't begin to tell the whole story. For chef John Gorham, each dish reflects a time, a place, a moment. For Gorham, food is more than mere sustenance. The Toro Bravo cookbook is an honest look behind the scenes: from Gorham's birth to a teenage mother who struggled with drug addiction, to time spent in his grandfather's crab-shack dance club, to formative visits to Spain, to becoming a father and opening a restaurant. Toro Bravo also includes 95 of the restaurant's recipes, from simple salads to homemade chorizo, along with an array of techniques that will appeal to both the home cook and the most seasoned, forearm-burned chef.

  • Author:
    Estabrook, Barry
    Summary:

    2012 IACP Award Winner in the Food Matters category Supermarket produce sections bulging with a year-round supply of perfectly round, bright red-orange tomatoes have become all but a national birthright. But in Tomatoland, which is based on his James Beard Award-winning article, "The Price of Tomatoes," investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry. Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States. How have we come to this point? Estabrook traces the supermarket tomato from its birthplace in the deserts of Peru to the impoverished town of Immokalee, Florida, a.k.a. the tomato capital of the United States. He visits the laboratories of seedsmen trying to develop varieties that can withstand the rigors of agribusiness and still taste like a garden tomato, and then moves on to commercial growers who operate on tens of thousands of acres, and eventually to a hillside field in Pennsylvania, where he meets an obsessed farmer who produces delectable tomatoes for the nation's top restaurants. Throughout Tomatoland, Estabrook presents a who's who cast of characters in the tomato industry: the avuncular octogenarian whose conglomerate grows one out of every eight tomatoes eaten in the United States; the ex-Marine who heads the group that dictates the size, color, and shape of every tomato shipped out of Florida; the U.S. attorney who has doggedly prosecuted human traffickers for the past decade; and the Guatemalan peasant who came north to earn money for his parents' medical bills and found himself enslaved for two years. Tomatoland reads like a suspenseful whodunit as well as an expose of today's agribusiness systems and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.

  • Author:
    Ross, Veronica
    Summary:

    Canada's foremost cookbook author began her career, not as a cook, but as a journalist writing for Canadian magazines. She was 60 when she turned her attention to food. Food That Really Schmecks immediately became a best-seller, and continues to sell 35 years later. It's more than a book of wonderful recipes - it also describes the Mennonite way of life. The success of that book led to two more Schmecks books and many other cookbooks. Edna has received the Order of Canada among many other awards. Over the years, Edna developed longstanding friendships with many of Canada's greatest writers, including Margaret Laurence, W.O. Mitchell, Sheila Burnford, and Pierre Berton. In 1991 she established The Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-fiction to recognize the first or second book of a Canadian writer. To Experience Wonder is the first book to explore behind the scenes of this successful writer's life. At the age of 97, Edna leads an active life at her cottage on Sunfish Lake, where she writes, reads, and welcomes the many aspiring writers who come to visit.

  • Author:
    Caldwell, Andrew
    Summary:

    Did you know that Adolf Hitler was a vegetarian and his longtime private chef was Jewish? What dish played an integral role in Marilyn Monroe's unsuccessful bid to woo back Bobby Kennedy? Part historical narrative and part grilling guide and cookbook, Andrew Caldwell's Their Last Suppers: Legends of History and Their Final Meals guides history buffs and gourmands alike through gastronomically inspired biographical accounts of more than 20 legendary personalities. Unearthing recipes as far back as 323 B.C., Caldwell, the History Chef, provides insight into 2,000 years of culinary lore. Each historical figure's profile includes a brief description of pursuits and accomplishments as well as little-known anecdotes, popular foods of his or her time period, recipes for the figure's actual last meal and cooking tips. Because the kitchens of Montezuma, Caesar, and other notables profiled within the book were often very basic, Caldwell brings their fare into modern kitchens, although he strongly believes that, whenever possible, grills and open fires should be used for most dishes and therefore provides specific preparation tips throughout. From the Titanic's 12-course tasting menu to personal recipes for Princess Diana's Favorite Watercress Soup, Elvis Presley's Fried Peanut Butter and Banana Sandwich, Julius Caesar's Ambrosia, Cleopatra's Hummus and Stone Crab a la Kennedy, historians and foodies alike will relish the trivia and tastings paired within Their Last Suppers: Legends of History and Their Final Meals.

  • Author:
    Fadiman, Anne
    Summary:

    A new memoir by the celebrated essayist that explores her relationship with her father, a lover of wine In The Wine Lover's Daughter, Anne Fadiman examines-with all her characteristic wit and feeling-her relationship with her father, Clifton Fadiman, a renowned literary critic, editor, and radio host whose greatest love was wine. An appreciation of wine-along with a plummy upper-crust accent, expensive suits, and an encyclopedic knowledge of Western literature-was an essential element of Clifton Fadiman's escape from lower-middle-class Brooklyn to swanky Manhattan. But wine was not just a class-vaulting accessory; it was an object of ardent desire. The Wine Lover's Daughter traces the arc of a man's infatuation from the glass of cheap Graves he drank in Paris in 1927; through the Chateau Lafite-Rothschild 1904 he drank to celebrate his eightieth birthday, when he and the bottle were exactly the same age; to the wines that sustained him in his last years, when he was blind but still buoyed, as always, by hedonism. Wine is the spine of this touching memoir; the life and character of Fadiman's father, along with her relationship with him and her own less ardent relationship with wine, are the flesh. The Wine Lover's Daughter is a poignant exploration of love, ambition, class, family, and the pleasures of the palate by one of our finest essayists.

  • Author:
    Adamson, Eve
    Summary:

    Like many physicians, Dr. Terry Wahls focused on treating her patients' ailments with drugs or surgical procedures-until she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2000. Within three years, her back and stomach muscles had weakened to the point where she needed a tilt-recline wheelchair. Conventional medical treatments were failing her, and she feared that she would be bedridden for the rest of her life.Dr. Wahls began studying the latest research on autoimmune disease and brain biology, and decided to get her vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and essential fatty acids from the food she ate rather than pills and supplements. Dr. Wahl's adopted the nutrient-rich paleo diet, gradually refining and integrating it into a regimen of neuromuscular stimulation. First, she walked slowly, then steadily, and then she biked eighteen miles in a single day. In November 2011, Dr. Wahls shared her remarkable recovery in a TEDx talk that immediately went viral. Now, in The Wahls Protocol, she shares the details of the protocol that allowed her to reverse many of her symptoms, get back to her life, and embark on a new mission: to share the Wahls Protocol with others suffering from the ravages of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune conditions.

  • Author:
    Ladner, Peter
    Summary:

    Our reliance on industrial agriculture has resulted in a food supply riddled with hidden environmental, economic, and health care costs and beset by rising food prices. With only a handful of corporations responsible for the lion's share of the food on our supermarket shelves, we are incredibly vulnerable to supply chain disruption. The Urban Food Revolution provides a recipe for community food security based on leading innovations across North America. The author draws on his political and business experience to show that we have all the necessary ingredients to ensure that local, fresh sustainable food is affordable and widely available. He describes how cities are bringing food production home by: *Growing community through neighborhood gardening, cooking, and composting programs *Rebuilding local food processing, storage, and distribution systems *Investing in farmers markets and community supported agriculture *Reducing obesity through local fresh food initiatives in schools, colleges, and universities *Ending inner-city food deserts Producing food locally makes people healthier, alleviates poverty, creates jobs, and makes cities safer and more beautiful. The Urban Food Revolution is an essential resource for anyone who has lost confidence in the global industrial food system and wants practical advice on how to join the local food revolution. Peter Ladner has served two terms as a Vancouver City Councilor. With more than thirty-five years of journalistic experience, he is a frequent speaker on community issues and has a special interest in the intersection of food policy and city planning.

  • Author:
    Waxman, Susan, Waxman, Denny
    Summary:

    With modern healthy diets constantly flip-flopping on what foods to eat and focusing on restricting calories, individuals can be left confused, defeated, and unsatisfied. This new book from acclaimed macrobiotic health and nutritional experts Denny and Susan Waxman leaves all negativity behind and brings to light a positive outlook on building one healthy habit at a time. Listeners will find healthy living easier than ever by learning how to apply these principles into a broad range of modern lifestyles and by being able to do so at their own pace. With new recipes from Susan Waxman, this book clears up misinformation about food, which allows you to better understand how to achieve your best physical, spiritual, and mental health. The Ultimate Guide to Eating for Longevity is not a diet fad; it's a nutritional guide based on the world's longest-standing civilizations, civilizations which have changed very little over time and have proven that it's possible to live a long, healthy life. Copy and paste the following link into your browser to retrieve downloadable PDF: http://chilp.it/472e478

  • Author:
    Jacobs, Ryan
    Summary:

    A thrilling journey through the hidden underworld of the world's most prized luxury ingredient. Beneath the gloss of star chefs and crystal-laden tables, the truffle supply chain is touched by theft, secrecy, sabotage, and fraud. Farmers patrol their fields with rifles and fear losing trade secrets to spies. Hunters plant poisoned meatballs to eliminate rival truffle-hunting dogs. Naive buyers and even knowledgeable experts are duped by liars and counterfeits. Deeply reported and elegantly written, this page-turning expose documents the dark, sometimes deadly crimes at each level of the truffle's path from ground to plate, making sense of an industry that traffics in scarcity, seduction, and cash. Through it all, a question lingers: What, other than money, draws people to these dirt-covered jewels?

  • Author:
    Micallef, Shawn
    Summary:

    What do your Eggs Benedict say about your notions of class' Every weekend, in cities around the world, bleary-eyed diners wait in line to be served overpriced, increasingly outrE food by hungover waitstaff. For some, the ritual we call brunch is a beloved pastime; for others, a bedeviling waste of time. But what dus its popularity say about shifting attitudes towards social status and leisure' In some ways, brunch and other forms of conspicuous consumption have blinded us to ever-more-precarious employment conditions. For award-winning writer and urbanist Shawn Micallef, brunch is a way to look more closely at the nature of work itself and a catalyst for solidarity among the so-called creative class. Drawing on theories from Thorstein Veblen to Richard Florida, Micallef traces his own journey from the rust belt to a cosmopolitan city where the evolving middle class he joined was oblivious to its own instability and insularity. The Trouble with Brunch is a provocative analysis of foodie obsession and status anxiety, but it's also a call to reset our class consciousness. The real trouble with brunch isn't so much bad service and outsized portions of bacon, it's that brunch could be so much more.

  • Author:
    Lebovitz, David
    Summary:

    An American pastry chef living in Paris shares his deliciously funny, offbeat, and irreverent look at the city of lights.

  • Author:
    Rioux, Sébastien
    Summary:

    The distribution of food played a considerable yet largely unrecognized role in the economic history of Victorian and Edwardian Britain. In the midst of rapid urbanization and industrialization, retail competition intensified and the channels by which food made it to the market became vital to the country's economic success. Illustrating the pivotal importance of food distribution in Britain between 1830 and 1914, The Social Cost of Cheap Food argues that labour exploitation in the distribution system was the key to cheap food. Through an analysis of labour dynamics and institutional changes in the distributive sector, Sébastien Rioux demonstrates that economic development and the rising living standards of the working class were premised upon the growing insecurity and chronic poverty of street sellers, shop assistants, and small shopkeepers. Rioux reveals that food distribution, far from being a passive sphere of economic activity, provided a dynamic space for the reduction of food prices. Positing food distribution as a core element of social and economic development under capitalism, The Social Cost of Cheap Food reflects on the transformation of the labour market and its intricate connection to the history of food and society.

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