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Pastoral fiction

  • Author:
    Lapointe, Annette
    Summary:

    Finalist, ReLit Award Finalist, McNally Robinson Book of the Year (Manitoba Book Awards) Finalist, Bisexual Book Award (USA) Whitetail Shooting Gallery, a new novel from award-winning author and Giller Prize nominee, Annette Lapointe, is set in the outer urban, often desolate, landscape of the Saskatchewan prairie. Cousins Jennifer and Jason live close together as small kids, exploring their rural home. They live in adjacent, sometimes overlapping, households. But one act of family violence begets another, and the cousins drift apart. By adolescence, the two are estranged. Jennifer grows closer to her best friend, Donna, an evangelical minister?s daughter who rebels against her family by immersing herself in a world of vectors, fractals, perfect math, and porn. Jason?s world is hockey. Donna likes his street-hockey bruises. Jason?s also interested in Gordon, a semi-recluse ex-teacher who lives on the periphery of town and constructs art installations from leather, tamarack, animal skulls, and other found items. Horses, bears, kissing cousins, and other human animals conspire in a series of conflicts that result in accidental gunfire and scarring--both physical and emotional--that takes many years to heal. Praise for Whitetail Shooting Gallery: BC Books for BC Schools Pick ?Imagine Alissa York?s Fauna but in rural Saskatchewan and with all the sentimentality stripped away. Imagine lots of sex, kissing cousins, a gunshot to the face, and a set of teeth that get kicked in over and over again. Imagine a family farmhouse, country roads, the kind of place you might want to move to raise your kids if you don?t look too closely. The hockey player, the pastor?s daughter, how he?s giving blow jobs to his teammates, and she?s having sex with her best friend. ? Whitetail Shooting Gallery baffled me thoughout, disturbed and troubled me, but it also intrigued me, continually surprised me, never stopped me wondering what would happen next. It?s an anti-pastoral, a complicated portrayal of rural life. ? Annette Lapointe?s literary reputation was established with Stolen, which was nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2006. And here in her second book, she?s turning Can-Lit on its head, challenging not only her readers? sensibilities, but also ideas about what a novel should be. And the latter seems to be a requirement for the kind of book that I like best.? (Pickle Me This) ?Wintry, notably offbeat, written with an elegant precision, and at times slyly funny ? Lapointe?s beautiful treatment of po?te maudit subject matter never fails to impress.? (The Vancouver Sun ) ?In Whitetail Shooting Gallery, Lapointe gives us an animalistic view of the teen world. This is not small-town rural life as idyllic or pastoral. Lapointe?s world reflects the turmoil, raging emotions and hormones brewing inside adolescents. ? the plot is almost secondary to Lapointe?s vivid, powerful voice and her beautifully savage view of rural prairie life.? (Winnipeg Free Press ) Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2012 Pick, 49th Shelf

  • Author:
    Wyss, Johann David
    Summary:

    Share with the Robinsons--a minister, his wife, and four sons--as they survive a shipwreck and then adapt to life on an island populated by exotic birds and animals. Through small successes and disappointments, not only does this courageous family survive, but comes to find a happiness that eluded them in their civilized homeland.

  • Author:
    Raddall, Thomas H.
    Summary:

    A Nova Scotia classic, The Nymph and the Lamp is the story of Isabel Jardin, a strong and sensitive woman, and the men in her life--the stoic Matthew Carney, a living legend, the passionate Gregory Skane, and the innocent but infatuated Jim Sargent. Set in the 1920s, the story unfolds against the wild desolation of Marina, a wind-swept island off the coast of Nova Scotia, as the characters come to terms with their personal contradictions and the demands of isolated island life.

  • Author:
    Berkhout, Nina
    Summary:

    Twyla Jane Lee has one goal. To finish senior year so she can get out of her military hometown of Halo, Montana. But to graduate, she needs to complete forty hours of community service, and that means helping out a rude and reclusive former Marine named Gabriel Finch. A young veteran of the conflicts in the Middle East, Gabriel spends his days holed up in a decommissioned nuclear missile silo on his family farm. Twyla assumes he's just another doomsday prepper, readying his underground shelter for Armageddon. But soon she finds out the truth, and it takes her breath away. Gradually the two misfits form a bond, and Twyla begins to unearth the secrets that have left the Marine battling ghosts. Her discoveries force her to question her views on the wars until she realizes that even if she gets out of Halo, she won't ever be able to leave Gabriel Finch's story behind her. A beautifully written and thought-provoking novel about a teen facing the collision of love, ideals and uncertainty about her own future.

  • Author:
    Ringland, Holly
    Summary:

    An enchanting and captivating novel about how our untold stories haunt us - and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive. After her family suffers a tragedy, nine-year-old Alice Hart is forced to leave her idyllic seaside home. She is taken in by her grandmother, June, a flower farmer who raises Alice on the language of Australian native flowers, a way to say the things that are too hard to speak. Under the watchful eye of June and the women who run the farm, Alice settles, but grows up increasingly frustrated by how little she knows of her family's story. In her early twenties, Alice's life is thrown into upheaval again when she suffers devastating betrayal and loss. Desperate to outrun grief, Alice flees to the dramatically beautiful central Australian desert. In this otherworldly landscape Alice thinks she has found solace, until she meets a charismatic and ultimately dangerous man. Spanning two decades, set between sugar cane fields by the sea, a native Australian flower farm, and a celestial crater in the central desert, The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart follows Alice's unforgettable journey, as she learns that the most powerful story she will ever possess is her own.

  • Author:
    Fawcett, Brian
    Summary:

    Middle-aged Andy Bathgate clings to a precarious life in the logging town of Prince George, British Columbia. He fears the balance he currently enjoys will come undone the moment the truth comes out: that he is not, in fact, Andy Bathgate. What he doesn't realize is that the people of his community aren't as clueless as he believes- and that honesty, decency, and fairness still have a place in the 21st century.

  • Author:
    Ramos, Joanne
    Summary:

    Life is a lucrative business, as long as you play by the rules. "[Joanne] Ramos's debut novel couldn't be more relevant or timely."-O: The Oprah Magazine (25 Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2019) Nestled in New York's Hudson Valley is a luxury retreat boasting every amenity: organic meals, personal fitness trainers, daily massages-and all of it for free. In fact, you're paid big money to stay here-more than you've ever dreamed of. The catch? For nine months, you cannot leave the grounds, your movements are monitored, and you are cut off from your former life while you dedicate yourself to the task of producing the perfect baby. For someone else. Jane, an immigrant from the Philippines, is in desperate search of a better future when she commits to being a "Host" at Golden Oaks-or the Farm, as residents call it. But now pregnant, fragile, consumed with worry for her family, Jane is determined to reconnect with her life outside. Yet she cannot leave the Farm or she will lose the life-changing fee she'll receive on the delivery of her child. Gripping, provocative, heartbreaking, The Farm pushes to the extremes our thinking on motherhood, money, and merit and raises crucial questions about the trade-offs women will make to fortify their futures and the futures of those they love. Advance praise for The Farm "This topical, provocative debut anatomizes class, race and the American dream."-The Guardian, "What You'll Be Reading This Year" "Wow, Joanne Ramos has written the page-turner about immigrants chasing what's left of the American dream...' Truly unforgettable."-Gary Shteyngart, New York Times bestselling author of Super Sad True Love Story and Lake Success "A highly original and provocative story about the impossible choices in so many women's lives. These characters will stay with me for a long time."-Karen Thompson Walker, New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Miracles and The Dreamers "Ramos has written a firecracker of a novel, at once caustic and tender, page-turning and thought-provoking. This is a fierce indictment of the vampiric nature of modern capitalism, which never loses sight of the very human stories at its center. ...'ighly recommended."-Madeline Miller, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Circe.

  • Author:
    Smith, Lee
    Summary:

    A magnificent 150-year saga of a musical Southern family featuring barn dances, medicine shows, the Grand Ole Opry, and the evolution of country music from hymns to rockabilly.

  • Author:
    BINCHY, Maeve
    Summary:

    Eight children once carved their names on the trunk of the great copper beech tree which shades the schoolhouse in Shancarrig. Now those children are grown. They have different lives but it was the school that formed them.

  • Author:
    Russell, Ted, Miller, Elizabeth
    Summary:

    Pigeon Inlet is the setting for Ted Russell’s stories, written for radio between 1953 and 1961. Here you will meet not only Uncle Mose, but other characters whose names have become synonymous with traditional outport life: Grampa and Grandma Walcott, Skipper Joe, Aunt Sophy, Jethro Noddy, and—of course—King David.

    Told with a combination of humour and respect and in a manner that captures the essence of folk narrative, these stories stand as a monument to the dignity of the outport Newfoundlander. Edited by Ted’s daughter, Elizabeth Miller, this book is a fine companion for Miller’s biography, Uncle Mose: The Life of Ted Russell.

  • Author:
    Perron, Jean
    Summary:

    « Des chevaux blancs, bruns et noirs apparaissent ici et là, détendus. On ne saurait dire s’ils font partie d’élevages ou s’ils vivent à l’état sauvage. Rien ne semble délimiter ce vaste territoire chargé d’énergie tellurique. Aucune clôture. Aucune affiche. Je sors mon caméscope pour capter ce paysage fuyant, sur lequel je ne peux toutefois projeter tout ce qui me passe par la tête en même temps : les souvenirs de Buenos Aires, encore brûlants, et les réflexions sur mon séjour dans cette ville. À l’opposé, je ne pourrais non plus, même si je tentais de tout oublier en plongeant mon regard dans le décor en mouvement par la fenêtre, effacer de ma mémoire les images et les pensées chargées de questions qui me poursuivent au rythme du train. Je me sens tatoué de l’intérieur, au son d’un tango aussi doux que déchirant. »

  • Author:
    Willard, Christopher
    Summary:

    An unsettling secret joins husband and wife as they sift through layers of recollection in a quest to find comfort, philosophical acceptance, and ultimately forgiveness. Set on a family farm in Sundre, Alberta during the late 1960s, at a time of transition when farming was shifting away from tradition, Sundre is a haunting meditation on the limits of love and mercy, on the natural and the unnatural.Told in a tone that is as dignified as it is unsettling, Sundre builds to a foreboding and fundamental revelation in a mood reminiscent of Sam Shepards best drama. Sundre is an homage to a way of life bygone and to lasting hard-earned truths.

  • Author:
    READ, Miss
    Summary:

    Miss Read, the village school teacher, relates the events of one particular summer.

  • Author:
    McBride, Celia
    Summary:

    In a support group for bereaved parents, Shayla, Lyle, Linee, and Jed each fight their personal demons in the search for life after the death of one's child. Set in the vast and remote landscape of Whitehorse, Yukon, playwright Celia McBride plunges into these characters' painful struggle to find a voice for their grief.

  • Author:
    Giles, W. Mark
    Summary:

    Finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award Dwight Eliot was born on a baseball diamond in the small town of Seep during a dugout-clearing brawl between his hometown team, The Seep Selects, and a visiting team of barnstorming Cuban All-Stars. Decades later, Dwight returns to town only to witness his childhood home being moved down the highway on the back of a huge flatbed truck. Seep is being dismantled, and the land is being redeveloped as a master-planned recreational townsite to complement a nearby First Nations casino. In the face of the town’s erasure, Dwight tries to preserve its stories, and in so doing, comes to question his own. And then his wayward brother, Darcy, arrives on his doorstep with the force of a bus crash. Seep limns the tension between land development and landscape, trauma and nostalgia, dysfunction and intimacy in a narrative of twenty-first century Canada. Praise for Seep: “Mark Giles’ Seep is a wickedly wonderful account of how our senses of self and of place can be interrelated, with the swirl of emotions involved in each part of the equation making for a complicated world and illuminating fiction. Giles assuredly steps in the footsteps of his predecessors who so engagingly limned the Alberta prairie: W.O. Mitchell, Henry Kreisel, W.P. Kinsella and Robert Kroetsch. But Giles’ novel brings us firmly into the present era of rampant real estate speculation and the conflicts that ensue when people seek to protect what they value about a locale.” (Tom Wayman, author of Dirty Snow and My Father’s Cup)

  • Author:
    Choyce, Lesley
    Summary:

    For Sylvie, Ragged Island - and the whales who swam around it - is the only world she has ever known. It is the place where she was born and raised, where she lived with her four late husbands, and where she plans to live out her remaining years. It is also the home to a community whose love for the island is immense. But when the Nova Scotia government decides to shut down the ferry service that is the lifeblood of Ragged Island, the residents see their world beginning to disappear. Sea of Tranquility is the lyrical and moving story of an island struggling to survive. Lesley Choyce’s seventh novel, it contains the elements for which the author is known: engaging characters, page-turning storyline, and uproarious humour. Choyce is in top form.

  • Author:
    Farley, Frank
    Summary:

    A young Englishman finds himself isolated in the Australian bush. Adventure and romance ensues as he discovers the reality of outback Australia.

  • Author:
    Juby, Susan
    Summary:

    Prudence Burns is an overly idealistic Brooklyn girl who has inherited a derelict plot of land named Woefield Farm. Her motley crew of farm hands consists of Earl, an elderly, reclusive bluegrass legend; Seth, an agoraphobic heavy-metal blogger in early recovery from alcoholism; and Sara, an 11-year-old girl with a flock of elite show poultry. When Prudence is felled by a thyroid condition, things on the farm begin to fall apart, resulting in valiant and sometimes ill-advised attempts to restore domestic bliss. Efforts are complicated by a renegade mule, attempts to turn a hideously ugly child's playhouse into a high-yield roadside farm stand, and an electrical station's worth of crossed wires. Will Prudence get well? Will Seth finally get rid of his pesky virginity? Will Earl rescue Sara? And will anyone, ever, admit they might be wrong?

  • Author:
    Harvey, Kenneth J.
    Summary:

    As a fatherless girl with a mother who persistently encouraged her daughter’s artistic temperament, Anna Wells is highly sensitive to the life developing in her when she discovers she is pregnant. Anna’s gynecologist boyfriend, Kevin, considers the time just not right to have children, so Anna moves to a 100-year-old house in Bareneed, an abandoned cove in Newfoundland, where she takes comfort in renovating the interior of her new home and working on a series of paintings detailing roses. Paralleling Anna’s own journey is a minutely detailed, day-by-day development of the embryo. All goes well until a car arrives delivering a court summons. Kevin has filed a statement of claim seeking the termination of the embryo as "return of property." One night, while still in Bareneed and upset over the impending legal action, Anna discovers an abandoned little girl almost frozen to death in her front yard. Mysterious circumstances continue to surround the children in Bareneed as pro-choice and pro-life factions marshal their forces.

  • Author:
    Cather, Willa
    Summary:

    Alexandra Bergsons, the daughter of Swedish immigrants, inherits her family's ailing farm in Hanover, Nebraska upon the death of her father. Over the years, she turns the farm into a successful enterprise. However, success has not brought peace, as passion and love intervene.

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