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Poetry

  • Author:
    Long Soldier, Layli
    Summary:

    An astonishing, powerful debut. Whereas her birth signaled the responsibility as mother to teach what it is to be Lakota therein the question: What did I know about being Lakota? Signaled panic, blood rush my embarrassment. What did I know of our language but pieces? Would I teach her to be pieces? Until a friend comforted, Don't worry, you and your daughter will learn together. Today she stood sunlight on her shoulders lean and straight to share a song in Diné, her father's language. To sing she motions simultaneously with her hands; I watch her be in multiple musics. Whereas confronts the coercive language of the United States government in its responses, treaties, and apologies to Native American peoples and tribes, and reflects that language in its officiousness and duplicity back on its perpetrators. Through a virtuosic array of short lyrics, prose poems, longer narrative sequences, resolutions, and disclaimers, Layli Long Soldier has created a brilliantly innovative text to examine histories, landscapes, her own writing, and her predicament inside national affiliations. "I am," she writes, "a citizen of the United States and an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, meaning I am a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation, and in this dual citizenship I must work, I must eat, I must art, I must mother, I must friend, I must listen, I must observe, constantly I must live." This strident, plaintive book introduces a major new voice in contemporary literature. Layli Long Soldier earned a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts and an MFA with honors from Bard College. She is the author of the chapbook Chromosomory (2010). A citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation, Long Soldier lives in Tsaile, Arizona, in the Navajo Nation.

  • Author:
    Belcourt, Billy-Ray
    Summary:

    Belcourt issues a call to turn to love and sex to understand how Indigenous peoples shoulder their sadness and pain without giving up on the future. His poems upset genre and play with form, scavenging for a decolonial kind of heaven where "everyone is at least a little gay."

  • Author:
    Dubie, Norman
    Summary:

    In his twenty-ninth collection of poems, Norman Dubie returns to a rich, color-soaked vision of the world. Strangeness becomes a parable for compassion, each poem leading the reader to an uncommon way of understanding human capacities. In the futuristic sphere of The Quotation of Bone, the mind wanders meditatively into an imaginative and uncontainable history.

  • Author:
    Antrobus, Raymond
    Summary:

    The Perseverance is the remarkable debut book by British-Jamaican poet Raymond Antrobus. Ranging across history and continents, these poems operate in the spaces in between, their haunting lyrics creating new, hybrid territories. The Perseverance is a book of loss, contested language and praise, where elegies for the poet’s father sit alongside meditations on the Deaf experience.

  • Author:
    Momaday, N. Scott
    Summary:

    Spanning nearly fifty years, the poems gathered here illuminate the human condition, Momaday's connection to his Kiowa roots, and his spiritual relationship to the American landscape.

  • Author:
    Reinhart, Lili
    Summary:

    This program is read by the author The debut collection of poetry from Lili Reinhart, the actress and outspoken advocate for mental health awareness and body positivity. I seem to be your new favorite novel. One that keeps you up at night, turning my pages. Fingers lingering on me so you don't lose your place. Swimming Lessons explores the euphoric beginnings of young love, battling anxiety and depression in the face of fame, and the inevitable heartbreak that stems from passion. Relatable yet deeply intimate, provocative yet comforting, bite-sized yet profound, Lili's poems reflect her trademark honesty and unique perspective. Swimming Lessons reveals the depths of female experience, and is the work of a storyteller who is coming into her own. A Macmillan Audio Production from St. Martin's Griffin

  • Author:
    Parisien, Dominik
    Summary:

    Ask, Can we for a moment make of beauty / the measure of our pain? and I will answer. To be ill is to be a body bursting with strangers. A curiosity. A narrative to interpret. Dominik Parisien's debut collection is a poignant celebration of the complicated lived experience of disability, a challenge to the societal gaze, and a bold reconfiguration of the language of pain. A powerful contribution to the field of disability poetics, Side Effects May Include Strangers is an affecting look at the multitude of ways a body is both boundary and boundless. Parisien takes bpNichol's claim that "what is a poem is inside of your body" and localizes the inner and outer lives of disabled, queer, and aging bodies as points of meaning for issues of autonomy, disability, sexuality, and language. Balancing hope and uncertainty, anger and gratitude, these poems shift from medical practice to myth, from trauma to intergenerational friendship, in an unflinching exploration of the beauty and complexity of othered bodies.

  • Author:
    Lleshanaku, Luljeta
    Summary:

    Albania’s Luljeta Lleshanaku grew up in negative space, living under family house arrest during the years of Enver Hoxha’s autocratic communist rule. Her recent poems are a response to what was missing then, not only in her life but for her whole generation, evoking absences, emptiness – what was unseen, unspoken or undone – through the concept of negative space. The space around objects, not the objects themselves, becomes the real, most significant part of an image, bringing balance to the whole of a composition, so enabling Lleshanaku to look back at the reality of her Albanian past and give voice to those who could not speak for themselves.

    Many of the poems are tied to no specific place or time. Histories intertwine and stories are re-framed, as in her long poem ‘Homo Antarcticus’, which traces the fate of an inspirational explorer who could adapt to months of near-starvation in sub-zero Antarctica but not to later life back in civilisation, one of a number of poems in the book relating to society’s pressure on the individual. Sorrow and death, love and desire, imprisonment and disappointment are all themes that echo deeply in Lleshanaku’s hauntingly beautiful poems.

    Negative Space draws on two recent collections published in Albania, Almost Yesterday (2012) and Homo Antarcticus (2015), and follows Haywire: New & Selected Poems, her first UK selection published by Bloodaxe in 2011, a Poetry Book Society Recommended Translation which was shortlisted for the Corneliu M. Popescu Prize in 2013.

  • Author:
    Kearley, Wade
    Summary:

    'I have been pummeled by the force of heartbreak and pain in some of these offerings. I have been washed in wistfulness and regret. I was metaphorically knocked to my knees by the author's intense viciousness toward the subject in his 'Crucifying Corey.' I have felt the powerful and raw emotions that run through this book. Mr. Kearley has held nothing back in his desire to write about emotions we so often try to deny having… What I have gained through Mr. Kearley's work is invaluable in seeing the range and depth of emotion that can shared through this literary forum.'.

  • Author:
    Mort, Valzhyna
    Summary:

    In her book of letters to the dead, the prize-winning poet Valzhyna Mort relearns how to mourn those erased by violent history. With shocking, unforgettable lyric force, Valzhyna Mort's Music for the Dead and Resurrected confronts the legacy of violent death in one family in Belarus. In these letters to the dead, the poet asks: How do we mourn after a century of propaganda? Can private stories challenge the collective power of Soviet and American historical mythology? Mort traces a route of devastation from the Chernobyl fallout and a school system controlled by ideology to the Soviet labor camps and the massacres of World War II. While musical form serves as a safe house for the poet's voice, old trees speak to her as the only remaining witnesses, hosts to both radiation and memory. Valzhyna Mort, born in Belarus and now living in the United States, conjures a searing, hallucinogenic ritual of rhythmic remembrance in a world where appeals to virtue and justice have irrevocably failed.

  • Author:
    Borzutzky, Daniel
    Summary:

    Lake Michigan, a series of 19 lyric poems, imagines a prison camp located on the beaches of Chicago that is privatized, racially segregated, and overrun by a brutal police force. Thinking about the ways in which economic policy, racism, and militarized policing combine to shape the city, Lake Michigan's poems explore the themes of estrangement, state violence and capitalist exploitation, and take a hard look at neoliberal urbanism in the historic city of Chicago.

  • Author:
    Eisen-Martin, Tongo
    Summary:

    This is truly revolutionary poetry. From the corner store to the dilapidated school, from the alleys between downtown office buildings to the prison, voices that have been through too much to care and yet still struggle on, relate the post-industrial U.S. Black experience. A vortex of images, observations, inspired leaps and free associations spill forth from a choir living in oppression and transience, invisible to and dismissive of the mainstream bourgeoisie. Moments of political and spiritual convergence, gangsterism and revolution, surrealism and blunt materiality are captured in the music of metaphor and pure intention. A modern-day Mystic, a true Seer, the depth of the poet's own humanity is rooted in every line, creating a liberated space for pain and beauty through a healing love for his people.

  • Author:
    Shapero, Natalie
    Summary:

    Shapero writes in an urgent vernacular that flirts, stings, implores and demands with apparent abandon."--Houston Chronicle "Shapero's poetics has real-world import for the way we use language to talk about messy things."-Volta Thought-provoking and sardonically expressive, Shapero is a self-proclaimed "hard child"-unafraid of directly addressing bleakness as she continually asks what it means to be human and to bring new life into the world. Hard Child is musical and argumentative, deadly serious yet tinged with self-parody, evoking the spirit of Plath while remaining entirely its own. From Hot Streak Actually it's ridiculous to opine on what kind of a dog I would be, were I ever a dog, as I don't contain within me half enough life to power a dog. I WOULD BE A DEAD DOG, THAT'S WHAT KIND, or maybe a mere industrial object boasting a low-grade animation, some odd beep or flicker, like a dryer or a bulb. So, sure, I could be a reluctant bulb, the only one still offering light in an otherwise burnt-out fixture bolted hard to a row house porch. And all those moths, with no other place to die. Can't they murder themselves on someone else?

  • Author:
    Momaday, N. Scott
    Summary:

    Poet N. Scott Momaday reflects on his native ground and its influence on his people. He recalls stories of his childhood passed down through generations that reveal a profound, sacred connection to the American landscape and a reverence for the natural world, offering both homage and a warning.

  • Author:
    Atwood, Margaret
    Summary:

    The collection of a lifetime from the bestselling novelist and poet. By turns moving, playful and wise, the poems gathered in Dearly are about absences and endings, ageing and retrospection, but also about gifts and renewals. They explore bodies and minds in transition, as well as the everyday objects and rituals that embed us in the present. Werewolves, sirens and dreams make their appearance, as do various forms of animal life and fragments of our damaged environment. Before she became one of the world's most important and loved novelists, Atwood was a poet. Dearly is her first collection in over a decade. It brings together many of her most recognizable and celebrated themes, but distilled - from minutely perfect descriptions of the natural world to startlingly witty encounters with aliens, from pressing political issues to myth and legend. It is a pure Atwood delight, and long-term readers and new fans alike will treasure its insight, empathy and humour.

  • Author:
    Atwood, Margaret
    Summary:

    This collection of poems addresses themes such as love, loss, the passage of time, the nature of nature, and, zombies.

  • Author:
    Harjo, Joy
    Summary:

    From poet laureate of the United States comes this collection of poems in which the joys and struggles of the everyday are played against the grinding politics of being human.

  • Author:
    Wallace, Bronwen, Smart, Carolyn
    Summary:

    Bronwen Wallace was recognized in the last decade of her short life as a major Canadian poet and a significant figure in the growth of the feminist movement. The author of five collections of poetry and a book of short fiction, most of which have been out of print for decades, Wallace worked in a range of poetic styles in a voice as intimate as a conversation between friends. Offering the full breadth of this celebrated poet's output in a single, long-awaited volume, Collected Poems of Bronwen Wallace brings the text of all five published collections back into print alongside unpublished poems from earlier in her career, allowing readers to see the stylistic evolution of her poetry from its first incarnation to her last written work. In an engaging and often moving tone, the poems draw the reader in even as they document the poet honing her craft during the turbulent 1970s and reveal her fascination with the politics of the personal, the everyday concerns of ordinary people, and inequality and violence. Carolyn Smart's introduction and notes supplement the collection, along with a bibliography that catalogues the scholarly and literary responses to Wallace's work for the first time. An exhilarating reading experience, Collected Poems of Bronwen Wallace celebrates the clarity, humour, righteous anger, and inclusivity of Wallace's poetry, which remains timely and original thirty years after her death.

  • Author:
    Cohen, Leonard
    Summary:

    Leonard Cohen wrote this book of poems during his five-year stay at a Zen monastery on Southern California's Mount Baldy, and in Los Angeles, Montreal, and Mumbai.

  • Author:
    Harjo, Joy
    Summary:

    A collection of poems from the first Native American US Poet Laureate, informed by her tribal history and connection to the land, that opens a dialogue with history.

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