Main content

Poetry

  • Author:
    Hollo, Anselm
    Summary:

    From "Art History": Someone comes along gives that tedious old thing a new twist or breaks its neck the old questions don't change: what do you want me to say' what do you want me to do' Anselm Hollo (1934-2013) authored more than forty books and was an award-winning translator. Born in Helsinki, Finland, he was fluent in German, Swedish, Finnish, and English by age ten. Hollo eventually settled in the United States in 1966, where he taught at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado.

  • Author:
    Mersal, Iman
    Summary:

    Iman Mersal is Egypt’s - indeed, the Arab world’s - great outsider poet. Over the past three decades, she has crafted a voice that is ferocious and tender, street-smart and vulnerable. Her early work captures the energies of Cairo’s legendary literary bohème, a home for “Lovers of cheap weed and awkward confessions / Anti-State agitators” and “People like me.” These are poems of wit and rage, freaked by moments of sudden beauty, like “the smell of guava” mysteriously wafting through the City of the Dead. Other poems bear witness to agonizing loss and erotic temptation, “the breath of two bodies that never had enough time / and so took pleasure in their mounting terror.” Mersal’s most recent work illuminates the trials of displacement and migration, as well as the risks of crossing boundaries, personal and political, in literature and in life.

  • Author:
    Kenyon, Michael
    Summary:

    If we do not sleep together by March then we will break apart.
    Now is the first. Now the second. Now the third. Now the fourth.
    If we do not lie down together, you wanting me, I you,

    we will break apart. Now is the fifth. Now the sixth. Now
    the seventh. Now the eighth. The sun shines and you’re angry. I’m scared
    to plan our lives, nothing left out. So we map our hunger

    and walk to the nearest town. Now the ninth. Now
    roses bloom in January:
    and poppy, calendula, azalea.

    From “New Year”

    In language at once simple and eloquent, Michael Kenyon’s The Sutler charts a falling and a rising, taking the reader through the grief of a failing relationship to the emergence of new possibility. Each poem is a gentleness deeply felt; each embued with a compassion, an honesty both stark and unflinching. Kenyon’s prose has shown him to be a consummate craftsman, and these poems are proof that he is a remarkable poet.

    “It is a delight to find a poet emerge full-grown from the head of a prose writer. In the two long poems, especially – ‘Death of a Samurai’ and ‘The Sutler’-the voice is original as well as mature. Let us rejoice!” – P.K. Page

    The Sutler is a book that aches with the glory of a trapped heart breaking free. The poems move through a cycle of transformation from the pain of separation to the renewal of self-discovery. The long poem from which the book draws its title is what Cormac McCarthy would write if he were a poet, and the poem sequence “Death of a Samurai” is an equally stunning lyrical meditation on a lost gesture from a remembered film… The Sutler … announces a fully formed and significant voice in Canadian poetry.” – Jay Ruzesky

  • Author:
    Bennett, Joshua
    Summary:

    Longlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize An acclaimed poet further extends his range into the realm of speculative fiction, while addressing issues as varied as abolition, Black ecological consciousness, and the boundless promise of parenthood Featuring the novella “The Book of Mycah,” soon to be adapted by Lena Waithe’s Hillman Grad Productions & Warner Bros. TV Across three sequences, Joshua Bennett’s new book recalls and reimagines social worlds almost but not entirely lost, all while gesturing toward the ones we are building even now, in the midst of a state of emergency, together. Bennett opens with a set of autobiographical poems that deal with themes of family, life, death, vulnerability, and the joys and dreams of youth. The central section, “The Book of Mycah,” features an alternate history where Malcolm X is resurrected from the dead, as is a young black man shot by the police some fifty years later in Brooklyn. The final section of The Study of Human Life are poems that Bennett has written about fatherhood, on the heels of his own first child being born last fall.

  • Author:
    Seeger, Pete
    Summary:

    This audio collection presents Pete Seeger's spoken words as he recounts his most engaging stories, narratives, and poems through musical traditions as diverse as African music, the blues, bluegrass, Celtic music, classical guitar, folk, Israeli music, jazz, Native American music, and Tuvan throat singing--taking Pete's wisdom and stories out to new audiences and into a new technological age.

  • Author:
    Summary:

    The most important anthology of American poetry ever recorded, this essential document is now available in three volumes from Recorded Books, digitally remastered with introductions and brief poet biographies. This volume includes works from the following poets: Edgar Lee Masters, James Weldon Johnson, Gertrude Stein, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, Wallace Stevens, Witter Bynner, Max Eastman, William Carlos Williams, Louis Untermeyer, Ezra Pound, William Rose Benét, John Hall Wheelock, Hilda Doolittle, Robinson Jeffers, Marianne Moore, John Crowe Ransom, T.S. Eliot, Conrad Aiken, Robert P. Tristam Coffin, Archibald MacLeish, Donald Davidson, Dorothy Parker, Mark Van Doren, E.E. Cummings, Babette Deutsch, Louise Bogan, Lenore G. Marshall, Stephen Vincent Benét, Malcolm Cowley, Allan Tate, Léonie Adams, Yvor Winters, and Oscar Williams.

  • Author:
    Rilke, Rainer Maria
    Summary:

    To Rilke himself the Sonnets to Orpheus were "perhaps the most mysterious in the way they came up and entrusted themselves to me, the most enigmatic dictation I have ever held through and achieved; the whole first part was written down in a single breathless act of obedience, between the 2nd and 5th of February, without one word being doubtful or having to be changed."

  • Author:
    Shakespeare, William
    Summary:

    Presents five dozen sonnets of Shakespeare, including some of the best known in all of English literature.

  • Author:
    Martinez, Cyrille, Stancil, Joseph Patrick
    Summary:

    John is a poet. Only John almost never writes poems, because he is also unemployed. He lives with four friends, and they squat in a loft in New York New York, a fantastical city that resembles the Big Apple, but also any other city where artists live. They throw fabulous parties and practice group sodomy. That is, until John meets Andy. Andy is an artist. Well, he is if you define art as something that people don't want but the artist wants to give them anyway. His work includes the Double-Murder Gun, which is just as likely to kill the shooter as the intended victim. A gallery owner with Tourette syndrome "discovers" his work and Andy is on his way to being famous. John, on the other hand, is hard at work at being unemployed, drinking all night and sleeping all day—which leaves him very little time for writing poems. Andy, watching him sleep, has an intriguing idea for a piece of art that he thinks will allow John to get paid for what he does best. Using the story of Andy Warhol and John Giorno and their film Sleep as a starting point, The Sleepworker reads like a Warhol film on fast-forward. 'As New York, capital of the twentieth century, recedes from memory, it becomes more like Paris; we flock to it to pay tribute to the great things that once happened there. New York is now a miasma of apocryphal myths feasting on its own corpse. On these pages, Martinez spins hazy rumor and wilting gossip into blistering contemporary fiction, holding up Warhol's mirror to the myth of Warhol himself. The result is a delicious celebration of simulacra where, like New York New York itself, nothing is true, but everything is permitted.' — Kenneth Goldsmith

  • Author:
    Moritz, A.F.
    Summary:

    Mortality, Love, Ethics, Civilization, Divine Presence, Human Body, Modernity, The Natural World, and Constructed Spaces. The Sentinel watches and reports back to us in a voice that is timeless and worthy of trust. Whether describing renewal and regeneration, the despair brought on by global capitalism, or a place where decay and loss meet their antithesis, A. F. Moritz's magisterial voice, rare insight, and supple craft are on impressive display.

  • Author:
    Nudelman, Merle
    Summary:

    The poems in this book trace the emotional and spiritual journey of a woman whose beloved son dies after an arduous battle with cancer. Nudelman explores the nexus between art, healing, and truth. As the woman gradually climbs out of grief's darkness she reclaims her own life's purpose. Confronting her losses, she heals. This collection is about strength, survival, love, and the healing that comes from self-empowerment through speaking one's own truth and releasing the past. Inspired by art and nature, the poet/mother reconnects with her own fortitude and the possibilities that still exist.

  • Author:
    Joseph, Eve
    Summary:

    Shortlisted for the 2010 City of Victoria Butler Book Prize
    and the 2011 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

    Transparent poems that gesture gracefully toward the great silence at the heart of things.

    Much of this poised and luminous book is rooted in an idea of epiphany, an aesthetic of everyday incarnation; not the sudden and profound manifestation of essence or meaning, but the smaller steps taken toward it. The moments in which, as Joyce writes, “the soul of the commonest object…seems to us radiant.” If epiphanies are for theologians, perhaps the little steps towards them are for poets like Eve Joseph, and for all of us who attempt to see beyond the names we give things to the names they give themselves.

    Shelter

    The rubber plant in the hospital cafeteria is waiting for rain. Palms up beneath a sky of fluorescent lights, its leaves are broad enough to be roof, temporary shelter, shade to small creatures caught in the open. The hiker, for instance, who has made a fire with wet twigs and hunkers down to wait it out under his wide blue tarpaulin.

    “…Eve Joseph’s craft and attention, her choice of the perfect word, give a kind of holiness to the song of everyday life. And if some of these poems are honed down to their elegant bones, others are expansive and wide open…”   – Patricia Young

  • Author:
    Lista, Michael
    Summary:

    The Scarborourgh takes place over three days in 1992: Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday—the weekend 15-year-old Kristin French was abducted and murdered by Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. In poems both opulent and stricken, ravishing and unflinching, Michael Lista—nine, at the time—revisits those dates, haunted by the horrifying facts he now possesses. Inspired, in part, by Dante’s Inferno, Virgil's tale of Orpheus’ descent into the underworld for Eurydice, as well as the Bernardo trial itself—where the judge ruled that the gallery could hear the video tapes of the crimes, but not see them—Lista’s poems adhere to a single rule: you cannot gaze at the beloved you seek to rescue. The Scarborourgh is book about Bernardo that doesn’t show us Bernardo, a conceptual project that ignores its concept. Shiveringly bold, it is a major achievement.

  • Author:
    Zeller, Ludwig
    Summary:

    The Rules of the Game reintroduces Ludwig Zeller, the great Chilean-Canadian “poet’s poet,” through a selection of his most engaging works. These short poems span a development of almost 60 years. They are Zeller’s brief songs of eroticism and love, adventure and nostalgia, youthful ardor, the sorrow of age, and undying hope. They give the reader a great poet’s door into the riches of surrealism, European Romanticism and the age-old Spanish lyric tradition.

  • Author:
    Wordsworth, William
    Summary:
  • Author:
    Nardone, Michael
    Summary:

    The Ritualites is Michael Nardone's book-length poem-the first in a series of planned works-on the sonic topography of North America. Composed at sites all across the continent-from Far Rockaway to the Olympic Peninsula, Great Bear Lake to the Gulf of California-the book documents the poet's listening amid our public exchanges, mediated ambiances, and itinerant intimacies. The Ritualites is a series of linguistic rituals that shift, page to page, through a range of forms and genres-a rhapsodic text for occasional singing and a best-selling thriller, a self-help guide and sabotage manual, a score for solo performance and a cacophony of voices.

  • Author:
    Bramer, Shannon
    Summary:

    The Refrigerator Memory is an exuberant, strangely funny celebration of sadness. With fable-like miniature stories and short lyric poems, Shannon Bramer creates a world littered with stolen pears and prosthetic arms and inhabited by Kindness scientists and hot-air-balloon operators. The poems invoke a world of childhood delights and demons in the context of grown-up fears and appetites: heartbreak, loss, jealousy and old-fashioned sibling rivalry. You’ll find the hopelessly misunderstood Love the Clown (never goes out without his red wig) and Noni, a forlorn young man who can’t stop crying. But while sadness plays a starring role, the true hero of the collection is the imagination; its transformative powers warm widows and drunken gods and designated mourners. You won’t forget The Refrigerator Memory: the icebox cometh to warm your heart. ‘Bramer’s “Our Prosthesis” … [is] wonderfully succinct, while still managing to convey entire lives floating beneath its surface.’ – Lee Gowan ‘[Bramer writes] poems with resonant grief, fragile glass and desperate love, carved carefully and spare out of cold, dark objects, achieving small, remarkable poems.’ – Rob McLennan

  • Author:
    Dubie, Norman
    Summary:

    In his twenty-ninth collection of poems, Norman Dubie returns to a rich, color-soaked vision of the world. Strangeness becomes a parable for compassion, each poem leading the reader to an uncommon way of understanding human capacities. In the futuristic sphere of The Quotation of Bone, the mind wanders meditatively into an imaginative and uncontainable history.

  • Author:
    Gibran, Kahlil
    Summary:

    The Prophet is a book of 26 poetic essays about Al-Mustafa who has lived in the foreign city of Orphalese for 12 years is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses many issues of life and the human condition. It is one of the most popular set of poems of all time.

  • Author:
    Lovelace, Amanda
    Summary:

    Winner of the 2016 Goodreads Choice Award, the princess saves herself in this one is a collection of poetry about resilience. It is about writing your own ending. From Amanda Lovelace, a poetry collection in four parts: the princess, the damsel, the queen, and you. The first three sections piece together the life of the author while the final section serves as a note to the listener. This moving book explores love, loss, grief, healing, empowerment, and inspiration. the princess saves herself in this one is the first book in the "women are some kind of magic" series.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Poetry