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True adventure stories

  • Author:
    Simpson, Joe
    Summary:

    The author relates his nearly fatal adventures mountaineering in the Andes, adventures that included a fall into a crevice, broken limbs, and return to safety.

  • Author:
    Casey, Quentin
    Summary:

    It was a frigid night in February 2013 when the lights aboard the Miss Ally, a 12-metre fishing boat, malfunctioned. The Miss Ally's crew, five young men from southern Nova Scotia, knew a wicked storm was approaching, but they also had thousands of dollars of fishing equipment baited and set on the ocean floor. Instead of gunning for shore, they decided to stay until morning and try to locate their buoys, nets, and hooks by daylight; the decision proved fatal. Sometime overnight, following calls to the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre and their loved ones on land, the Miss Ally capsized. Despite an extensive search, the vicious winter storm prevented any form of rescue from sea or air, and all five fishermen―Katlin Nickerson, Joel Hopkins, Cole Nickerson, Tyson Townsend, and Billy Jack Hatfield―were lost at sea. Their bodies were never found. Through interviews with the crew's families and co-workers, the Coast Guard Joint Rescue Co-ordination Team, and members of the tight-knit fishing communities of Woods Harbour and Cape Sable Island, award-winning journalist Quentin Casey pieces together the night the Miss Ally foundered, weaving in the backstories and the aftermath of this tragic accident. Includes 10 black-and-white photos.

  • Author:
    Peterson, Coyote
    Summary:

    Coyote Peterson, YouTube star, animal enthusiast, and creator of the Brave Adventure series, has tracked down some of the world's most painfully stinging insects and chronicled getting stung by each of them on his YouTube channel. Coyote has saved the best--or possibly the worst--for last, and he's finally ready to share his experience with the most painful sting in the world: the Executioner Wasp.

  • Author:
    Vallely, Kevin
    Summary:

    Four men in a rowboat make an historic attempt on the Northwest Passage to focus global attention on an environmental catastrophe. "Vallely transports the reader to places few will ever go: the very edges of the earth and of human endurance." -Evan Solomon In this gripping first-hand account, four seasoned adventurers navigate a sophisticated, high-tech rowboat across the Northwest Passage. One of the "last firsts" remaining in the adventure world, this journey is only possible because of the dramatic impacts of global warming in the high Arctic, which provide an ironic opportunity to draw attention to the growing urgency of climate change. Along the way, the team repeatedly face life-threatening danger from storms unparalleled in their ferocity and unpredictability and bears witness to unprecedented changes in the Arctic habitat and inhabitants, while weathering gale-force vitriol from climate change deniers who have taken to social media to attack them and undermine their efforts.

  • Author:
    Mossman, David
    Summary:

    Random Shots tells the stories of survival against the odds, the life of a well-travelled risking-taking Maritime son. Fortunate to have survived numerous near misses during the lead-up to his eightieth trip around the Sun, Mossman has much to be grateful for along the paths taken to adventure.

  • Author:
    Kingsley, Jennifer
    Summary:

    Paddlenorth tells the riveting story of Jennifer Kingsley’s 54-day paddling adventure on the Back River in the northern wilderness of the Arctic as she and her five companions battle raging winds, impenetrable sea ice, treacherous rapids, and agonizing sores and blisters while contending with rising tensions among the group. But they also experience the lasting joy of grizzly sightings, icy swims, and the caribou’s summer migration.

    Woven through this spellbinding narrative are often-harrowing accounts of the journeys of earlier explorers, some of whom never made it back home. Paddlenorth paints an indelible portrait of the spectacular Arctic landscape, rendered with a naturalist’s eye and an artist’s sensibility, and offers an eloquent exploration of how wilderness changes us.
    Published in Partnership with the David Suzuki Institute.

  • Author:
    Chaput, Martin
    Summary:

    Une aventure au cœur des vestiges historiques de l'Égypte Un homme part aux confins du monde pour s'efforcer d'accepter le deuil d'un proche. Malgré un ton parfois brutal, le tout se transforme en une aura poétique, mêlée à un humour irrévérencieux. Tout au long d'un itinéraire parcouru hors des sentiers touristiques, nous suivons le personnage, qui bien que férocement troublé, entreprend une quête de paix intérieure. À travers le décor funéraire et mystérieux de l'Égypte antique, ses tribulations, jumelées aux différences culturelles d'un peuple étranger, le conduiront à tenter de trouver un sens à la vie… et à la mort.

  • Author:
    Proenneke, Richard
    Summary:

    In More Readings from One Man's Wilderness: The Journals of Richard L. Proenneke, 1974-1980 readers find one of Alaska's best known wilderness icons going about his daily chores, documenting wildlife behavior, and participating in the creation of Lake Clark National Monument in 1978-79 and later the National Park and Preserve in 1980.

  • Author:
    Cremonesi, Kathleen, Inchbald, Isabella
    Summary:

    If you live life without a net, what happens when you fall? Kathleen Cremonesi knew early on she wanted to be different. Determined to avoid following in her mother’s footsteps to an ill-fated marriage, Kathleen left Oregon in her early 20s to travel across Europe. On a whim, this former administrative assistant with wanderlust took a job as a dancer in an Italian circus and, working her way up, became an ostrich-riding, shark-taming showgirl. Kathleen bonds with the exotic animals that could strike and kill at any moment, but instead bring her a peace she has never known. And when she stumbles into the arms of Stefano, the sexy elephant keeper, she finds a man who understands her wild spirit. With thrilling prose and vivid descriptions, Kathleen takes the reader around the Mediterranean, where she discovers unexpected friends and learns how to cook, forgive, and love — across language barriers.

  • Author:
    Levy, Buddy
    Summary:

    Based on the author's exhaustive research, the incredible true story of the Greely Expedition, one of the most harrowing adventures in the annals of polar exploration. In July 1881, Lt. A.W. Greely and his crew of 24 scientists and explorers were bound for the last region unmarked on global maps. Their goal: Farthest North. What would follow was one of the most extraordinary and terrible voyages ever made. Greely and his men confronted every possible challenge'vicious wolves, sub-zero temperatures, and months of total darkness'as they set about exploring one of the most remote, unrelenting environments on the planet. In May 1882, they broke the 300-year-old record, and returned to camp to eagerly await the resupply ship scheduled to return at the end of the year. Only nothing came. 250 miles south, a wall of ice prevented any rescue from reaching them. Provisions thinned and a second winter descended. Back home, Greely's wife worked tirelessly against government resistance to rally a rescue mission. Months passed, and Greely made a drastic choice: he and his men loaded the remaining provisions and tools onto their five small boats, and pushed off into the treacherous waters. After just two weeks, dangerous floes surrounded them. Now new dangers awaited: insanity, threats of mutiny, and cannibalism. As food dwindled and the men weakened, Greely's expedition clung desperately to life. Labyrinth of Ice tells the true story of the heroic lives and deaths of these voyagers hell-bent on fame and fortune'at any cost'and how their journey changed the world.

  • Author:
    Bown, Stephen R.
    Summary:

    The immense eighteenth-century scientific journey, variously known as the Second Kamchatka Expedition or the Great Northern Expedition, from St. Petersburg across Siberia to the coast of North America, involved over 3,000 people and cost Peter the Great over one-sixth of his empire's annual revenue. Led by the legendary Danish captain Vitus Bering, the ten-year voyage, which included scientists, artists, mariners, soldiers, and laborers, discovered Alaska, opened the Pacific fur trade, and, thanks to the brilliant naturalist Georg Steller, discovered dozens of New World plants and animals. The story of the expedition is a tale not only of adventure and historic achievement, but also of shipwreck, endurance, and one of the most tragic and ghastly trials of suffering in the annals of maritime and arctic history.

  • Author:
    Peters, Stephanie True
    Summary:

    In Whistler, British Columbia, dogs can be found riding chairlifts, perched on skiers' shoulders, and even descending from helicopters, all in the race against time to save people caught in the path of an avalanche. Meet Henry, a lovable border collie, and the team of dogs and human partners he works with in the beautiful and sometimes dangerous mountains.

  • Author:
    Crow, Katrine
    Summary:

    Two young explorers journey on a trip across Canada as they share their favorite cities, parks, and landmarks from coast to coast. Facts about Canada's culture, geography, and history put a fun and informative spin on this nonfiction book that every young traveler is sure to enjoy.

  • Author:
    Crofton, Ian
    Summary:

    Bringing together extraordinary stories of daring escapes from prison, POW camps, and other places of incarceration and confinement, this collection draws from every period of history and from every corner of the world. In addition to telling the stories of the most celebrated and notorious of prison breaks, it also recounts the classic POW escape stories of World War II, including the "Great Escape" that was immortalized by the eponymous 1960s movie starring Steve McQueen. This celebration of human ingenuity and daredevil courage offers the reader an exhilarating and unforgettable sequence of escape stories.

  • Author:
    Chaundy-Smart, David
    Summary:

    The first English-language biography of one of the most renowned Italian climbers, Emilio Comici, who bagged over 200 first ascents in the Eastern Alps prior to his death at 39 years of age in 1940. Between 1925 and his death in 1940, Emilio Comici was the pre-eminent climber in the Eastern Alps, the hotbed of global rock climbing at that time. He made first ascents on some of the highest and most notorious walls in the Alps, including the northwest face of the Civetta, as well as dozens of other climbs.Comici invented many modern big-wall techniques and the big-wall idiom itself that later took root in Yosemite Valley. Comici also made solo ascents of some of the hardest routes in the Alps, including his climb on the north face of the Cima Grande. He also designed the first artificial climbing wall that was ever actually built.This book explores how family tragedy and growing up in working class Trieste under Austrian occupation shaped Comici's complex personality and attitudes toward climbing. He was loyal to his friends, deeply concerned about the vulnerable, including his fellow climbers, and yet highly competitive, a born vagabond and yet also a dandy, irresistible to women, and yet unable to settle down, devoted to his mother and to the mountains, and finally, like many other Italian climbers of the period, a member of the Italian fascist party although he was profoundly anti-German and opposed to racial persecution.

  • Author:
    Choyce, Lesley
    Summary:

    Novelist Lesley Choyce weaves together his real-life adventures living by the sea at Lawrencetown Beach on Nova Scotia’s Eastern Shore. He writes of his love for the rugged coast and tells tales of the ordinary and the extraordinary. His story includes accounts of what it’s like surfing in the Canadian North Atlantic through all four seasons including the frigid depths of winter. Also threading its way through this narrative is the story of Minnie’s piano. There is music here in word and spirit along with the lessons learned from the old and the young. Driving Minnie’s Piano is an eloquent personal memoir about the precious and fateful moments that change our lives. It is an exploration of what makes us tick and prompts us to be both heroes and fools in the daily enterprise of living.

  • Author:
    Ferguson, Rob
    Summary:

    When Rob Ferguson went off to the five former Soviet ’Stans of Central Asia to work on a project to save the rapidly disappearing Aral Sea, he expected to have challenges and adventures, but he didn’t anticipate ending up a suspect in a brutal murder investigation. Dancing with Vodka Terrorists is a tragicomic farce and an engrossing real-life thriller told with panache and wry humour and stars a bizarre cast of corrupt apparatchiks, jolly consultants, devious autocrats and a bewitching belly-dancer who ends up gutted in a bathtub. Somehow Ferguson survives it all, wit still intact.

  • Author:
    Wylie, Ken
    Summary:

    On January 20, 2003, at 10:45 a.m., a massive avalanche released from Tumbledown Mountain in the Selkirk Range of British Columbia. Tonnes of snow carried 13 members of two guided backcountry skiing groups down the 37-degree incline of a run called La Traviata and buried them. After a frantic hour of digging by remaining group members, an unthinkable outcome became reality. Seven people were dead. The tragedy made international news, splashing photos of the seven dead Canadian and US skiers on television screens and the pages of newspapers. The official analysis was that guide error was not a contributing factor in the accident. This interpretation has been insufficient for some of the victims' families, the public and some members of the guiding community. Why did the guiding team seemingly ignore a particularly troublesome snowpack? Why were two groups travelling so close together? Were the guides adhering to best practices for terrain selection and snow stability evaluation? What motivated them to go there? Buried is the assistant guide's story. It renders an answerable truth about what happened by delving deep into the human factors that played into putting people in harm's way. The story begins buried metres deep in snow, and through care-filled reflection emerges slowly like spring after a long winter, nurturing a hopeful, courageous dialogue for all who make journeys through the mountains of their life. The story illustrates the peace that comes from accountability and the growth that results from understanding.

  • Author:
    Salmon, Lynn J., MacFarlane, John M.
    Summary:

    For three years Voss and the Tilikum, aided by a rotating cast of characters, visited Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Brazil and finally England, weathering heavy gales at sea and attracting large crowds of spectators on shore. The austere on-board conditions and simple navigational equipment Voss used throughout the voyage are a testimony to his skill and to the solid construction of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth vessel. Both Voss and his original mate, newspaperman N.K. Luxton, later wrote about their journey in accounts compromised by poor memories, brazen egos and outright lies. Stories of murder, cannibalism and high-seas terror have been repeated elsewhere without any regard to the truth. Now, over a century later, a full and fair account of the voyage--and the magnitude of Voss's accomplishment--is at last fully detailed. In this groundbreaking work, marine historians John MacFarlane and Lynn Salmon sift fact from fiction, critically examining the claims of Voss's and Luxton's manuscripts against research from libraries, archives, museums and primary sources around the world. Including unpublished photographs, letters and ephemera from the voyage, Around the World in a Dugout Canoe tells the real story of a little-understood character and his cedar canoe. It is an enduring story of courage, adventure, sheer luck and at times tragedy.

  • Author:
    Shoalts, Adam
    Summary:

    Canada's real-life Indiana Jones reminds us that the age of exploration is not over. When Adam Shoalts ventured into the largest unexplored wilderness on the planet, he hoped to set foot where no one had ever gone before. What he discovered surprised even him, and made him a media sensation. What struck a chord with people was the realization that the world is bigger than we think. We assume that because we have mapped it from space, it must be exhaustively known. But it is wilder, stranger, less homogenous than we assume. We hardly know it. And, contrary to popular wisdom, it is certainly not flat. In other words, the age of exploration is not over.

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