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Essays

  • Author:
    McFarlane, Bonnie
    Summary:

    It took Bonnie McFarlane a lot of time, effort, and tequila to get to where she is today. In this memoir, Bonnie tells it like it is and lays bare all of her smart (and her not-so-smart) decisions along her way to finding her comedic voice.

  • Author:
    Bruce, Leslie Anne
    Summary:

    Journalist Leslie Anne Bruce acknowledges that, yes, motherhood is a total mind f*ck, and offers the self-empowerment lessons new mothers need to get through the psychic upheaval and emerge stronger. After childbirth, a woman's body, her relationships, and her sense of self are tested like never before. Bruce encourages readers to look past sugarcoated truisms about child-rearing in order to embrace the real joys of motherhood, spit-up stains and all.

  • Author:
    Abdou, Angie, 1969-, Dopp, Jamie, 1957-
    Summary:

    Sport literature is never just about sport. The genre's potential to explore the human condition, including aspects of violence, gender, and the body, has sparked the interest of writers, readers, and scholars. Over the last decade, a proliferation of sport literature courses across the continent is evidence of the sophisticated and evolving body of work developing in this area. Writing the Body in Motion offers introductory essays on the most commonly taught Canadian sport literature texts. The contributions sketch the state of current scholarship, highlight recurring themes and patterns, and offer close readings of key works. Organized chronologically by source text, ranging from Shoeless Joe (1982) to Indian Horse (2012), the essays offer a variety of ways to read, consider, teach, and write about sport literature.

  • Author:
    Irby, Samantha
    Summary:

    A new rip-roaring essay collection from the smart, edgy, hilarious, unabashedly raunchy, and bestselling Samantha Irby. Irby is forty, and increasingly uncomfortable in her own skin despite what Inspirational Instagram Infographics have promised her. She has left her job as a receptionist at a veterinary clinic, has published successful books and has been friendzoned by Hollywood, left Chicago, and moved into a house with a garden that requires repairs and know-how with her wife in a Blue town in the middle of a Red state where she now hosts book clubs and makes mason jar salads. This is the bourgeois life of a Hallmark Channel dream. She goes on bad dates with new friends, spends weeks in Los Angeles taking meetings with "tv executives slash amateur astrologers" while being a "cheese fry-eating slightly damp Midwest person," "with neck pain and no cartilage in [her] knees," who still hides past due bills under her pillow. The essays in this collection draw on the raw, hilarious particulars of Irby's new life. Wow, No Thank You is Irby at her most unflinching, riotous, and relatable.

  • Author:
    Crocker, Diane, Minaker, Joanne, Neland, Amanda
    Summary:

    We live in a moment of renewed and highly visible action on the issue of sexual violence. Rape culture is a real and salient force that dominates campus climates and student experiences. Canada has drafted a national framework, provincial legislation, and institutional policy to address incidences of sexual violence, and students have demanded that their universities respond. Yet rape culture persists on campuses throughout North America. Violence Interrupted presents different ways of thinking about sexual violence. It draws together multiple disciplinary perspectives to synthesize new conceptual directions on the nature of the problem and the changes that are required to address it. Analyzing survey data, educational programs, participatory photography projects, interviews, autoethnography, legal case studies, and existing policy, contributors open up the conversation to illustrate sexual violence on campus as a structural, cultural, and complex social phenomenon. The diversity of methodologies sets this study apart: a problem as complex and far-reaching as rape culture must be approached from a multitude of angles. Decades have passed since student advocates first called for "no means no" campaigns, but universities are still struggling to evolve. Violence Interrupted answers the call by bridging the gap between advocacy, research, and institutional change.

  • Author:
    Acho, Emmanuel
    Summary:

    This program is read by the author, and includes a bonus conversation. An urgent primer on race and racism, from the host of the viral hit video series " Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man" "You cannot fix a problem you do not know you have." So begins Emmanuel Acho in his essential guide to the truths Americans need to know to address the systemic racism that has recently electrified protests in all fifty states. "There is a fix," Acho says. "But in order to access it, we're going to have to have some uncomfortable conversations." In Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man , Acho takes on all the questions, large and small, insensitive and taboo, many white Americans are afraid to ask—yet which all Americans need the answers to, now more than ever. With the same open-hearted generosity that has made his video series a phenomenon, Acho explains the vital core of such fraught concepts as white privilege, cultural appropriation, and "reverse racism." In his own words, he provides a space of compassion and understanding in a discussion that can lack both. He asks only for the listener's curiosity—but along the way, he will galvanize all of us to join the antiracist fight. A Macmillan Audio production from Flatiron Books

  • Author:
    Cutrara, Samantha
    Summary:

    We are all our history. Yet in Canadian classrooms, students are often left questioning how they can study a past that does not reflect their present. Discourses of nationhood often separate “us” from “them,” and despite curricular revisions, the mainstream narrative that shapes the way we teach students about the Canadian nation can be divisive. Responding to the evolving demographics of an ethnically and culturally diverse population, Transforming the Canadian History Classroomadvocates for a radically innovative practice that places students – the stories they carry and the histories they want to be part of – at the centre of history education.

  • Author:
    Boehm, Leslie A.
    Summary:

    Canadians view their healthcare – recognized throughout the world as an exemplary system – as iconic and integral to their identity. In Toward the Health of a Nation Leslie Boehm recounts the first seventy years in the life of one of the foundations of Canada's healthcare system, the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Boehm – a graduate of IHPME, and an instructor there throughout his career – charts the institute's history from its inception in 1947 as the Department of Hospital Administration to the present day. The first program of its kind in Canada, and one of the few in the world, the school was founded at a time when the issue of healthcare was becoming a significant part of national and provincial discussions and policies. Initially concentrating on hospital management and professional degrees, it has expanded to offer academic degrees and facilitate important research into health systems, policies, and outcomes. In Toward the Health of a Nation Boehm demonstrates the excellence of the program, its faculty, and its graduates, as well as their accomplishments in major government initiatives and royal commissions. In the seventy years since IHPME's inception healthcare has grown to become a major part of government and business activity, and it will only increase in coming years. An in-depth history of a major program in graduate health education, Toward the Health of a Nation highlights how important healthcare is to a modern, functional society.

  • Author:
    Flink, David
    Summary:

    Here David Flink enlarges our understanding of the learning process and offers powerful, innovative strategies for parenting, teaching, and supporting students with learning disabilities.This brilliant, compassionate work is packed with essential insights and real-world applications.

  • Author:
    Bennett, Paul W.
    Summary:

    Over the last fifty years, Canada's public schools have been absorbed into a modern education system that functions much like Max Weber's infamous iron cage. Crying out for democratic school-level reform, the system is now a centralized, bureaucratic fortress that, every year, becomes softer on standards for students, less accessible to parents, further out of touch with communities, and surprisingly unresponsive to classroom teachers. Exploring the nature of the Canadian education order in all its dimensions, The State of the System explains how public schools came to be so bureaucratic, confronts the critical issues facing kindergarten to grade 12 public schools in all ten provinces, and addresses the need for systemic reform. Going beyond a diagnosis of the stresses, strains, and ills present in the system, Paul Bennett proposes a bold plan to re-engineer schools on a more human scale as the first step in truly reforming public education. In place of school consolidation and managerialism, one-size-fits-all uniformity, limited school choice, and the "success-for-all" curriculum, Bennett advocates for a new set of priorities: decentralize school governance, deprogram education ministries and school districts, listen to parents and teachers, and revitalize local education democracy. Tackling the thorny issues besetting contemporary school systems in Canada, The State of the System issues a clarion call for more responsive, engaged, and accountable public schools.

  • Author:
    Langer, Ellen J.
    Summary:

    Mindful learning takes place with an awareness of context and of the ever-changing nature of information. Learning without this awareness, as Langer shows convincingly, has severely limited uses and often sets on up for failure.

  • Author:
    Conaboy, Kelly
    Summary:

    Kelly Conaboy presents a funny exploration of the joy found in loving a dog so much it makes you feel like you're going to combust. Follow Peter and his owner to Woofstock and canine dance lessons. From learning about Peter's DNA, to seeing if dogs can sense ghosts, this book will give listeners a smart, entertaining look into the funny world of dogs.

  • Author:
    Summary:

    Robert Kroetsch, one of Canada's most important writers, was a fierce regionalist with a porous yet resilient sense of "home." Although his criticism and fiction have received extensive attention, his poetry remains underexplored. This exuberantly polyvocal text by Dennis Cooley - who knew Kroetsch and worked with him for decades - seeks to correct this imbalance. This work offers a dazzling, playful, and intellectually complex conversation that draws together personal recollections, Kroetsch's archival materials, and the international body of Kroetsch scholarship. For literary scholars and anyone who appreciates Canadian literature, The Home Place will represent the standard critical evaluation of Kroetsch's poetry for years to come.

  • Author:
    Clausen, Kurt W., Black, Glenda
    Summary:

    While the action research community across Canada is a vibrant one, it remains scattered, dismissed as rootless and still unproven. This book illuminates action research as a vital and long-established Canadian perspective, taking stock of its use in education by a wide array of scholars and practitioners. Reflecting an inclusive range of viewpoints from twenty-two scholars across the nation, chapters show without question that action research - encompassing collaborative, iterative, and practice-based research - is a growing field in Canada. Authors bring a range of experiences that speak to the many facets of this movement. They discuss historical foundations, individual and large-scale projects dealing with a multitude of subject areas and educational practices, and participatory methods that speak to the discipline's capacity to engage with the pressing social issues of our time. A timely intervention that threads the field together and serves as both a reference and a guide to further work, The Future of Action Research in Education draws clear links between the past and future and maps bold new directions for this approach.

  • Author:
    Sedaris, David
    Summary:

    From a spectacular career spanning almost three decades, these stories, selected by Sedaris himself, have become modern classics and are now for the first time collected in one volume.

  • Author:
    Freeman, John
    Summary:

    Building from his acclaimed anthology Tales of Two Americas, beloved writer and editor John Freeman draws together a group of our greatest writers from around the world to help us see how the environmental crisis is hitting some of the most vulnerable communities where they live. In the past five years, John Freeman, previously editor of Granta, has launched a celebrated international literary magazine, Freeman's , and compiled two acclaimed anthologies that deal with income inequality as it is experienced. In the course of this work, one major theme came up repeatedly: Climate change is making already dire inequalities much worse, devastating further the already devastated. But the problems of climate change are not restricted to those from the less developed world. Galvanized by his conversations with writers and activists around the world, Freeman engaged with some of today's most eloquent storytellers, many of whom hail from the places under the most acute stress—from the capital of Burundi to Bangkok, Thailand. The response has been extraordinary. Margaret Atwood conjures with a dystopian future in a remarkable poem. Lauren Groff whisks us to Florida; Edwidge Danticat to Haiti; Tahmima Anam to Bangladesh; Yasmine El Rashidi to Egypt, while Eka Kurniawan brings us to Indonesia, Chinelo Okparanta to Nigeria, and Anuradha Roy to the Himalayas in the wake of floods, dam building, and drought. This is a literary all-points bulletin of fiction, essays, poems, and reportage about the most important crisis of our times.

  • Author:
    Shafi, Hana
    Summary:

    Let's get one thing straight: Small, Broke, and Kind of Dirty: Affirmations for the Real Worldis not a book of advice. You're not going to find a step-by-step guide to meditation here, or even reminders to drink lots of water and get enough sleep. Those things are all good for you, but that's not what Hana Shafi wants to talk about.Instead, Small, Broke, and Kind of Dirty—built around art from Shafi's popular online affirmation series—focuses on our common and never-ending journey of self-discovery. It explores the ways in which the world can all too often wear us down, and reminds us to remember our worth, even when it's hard to do so. Drawing on her experience as a millennial woman of colour, and writing with humour and a healthy dose of irreverence, Shafi delves into body politics and pop culture, racism and feminism, friendship, and allyship. Through it all, she remains positive without being saccharine, and hopeful without being naive.So no, this is not an advice book: it's a call to action, one that asks us to remember that we are valid as we are—flaws and all—and to not let the bastards grind us down.

  • Author:
    Taussig, Rebekah
    Summary:

    Disability affects all of us, directly or indirectly, at one point or another. By exploring this truth in essays, Taussig illustrates the need for more stories and more voices to understand the diversity of humanity.

  • Author:
    Salami, Minna
    Summary:

    A collection of thought provoking essays that explore questions central to how we see ourselves, our history, and our world. Salami offers fresh insights on key cultural issues that impact women's lives, including power, beauty, and knowledge. She also examines larger subjects, such as Afrofuturism, radical Black feminism, and gender politics.

  • Author:
    Esposito, Cameron
    Summary:

    Cameron Esposito wanted to be a priest and ended up a standup comic. In this memoir, she tells the whole, freaking queer as hell story.

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