Main content

Essays

  • Author:
    Esposito, Cameron
    Summary:

    Cameron Esposito wanted to be a priest and ended up a standup comic. In this memoir, she tells the whole, freaking queer as hell story.

  • Author:
    Summary:

    A colleciton of essays from writers and comedians that captures the formative moments in our lives that we are typically too afraid to share. Topics range from trauma to sexuality to love to loss to finally understanding what human connection means.

  • Author:
    Calhoun, Craig J.
    Summary:

    This collection of essays presents groundbreaking work from an interdisciplinary group of leading theorists and scholars representing the fields of history, philosophy, political science, sociology, and anthropology. The volume will introduce readers to some of the most compelling new conceptual and theoretical understandings of secularism and the secular, while also examining socio-political trends involving the relationship between the religious and the secular from a variety of locations across the globe. In recent decades, the public has become increasingly aware of the important role reli.

  • Author:
    Atwood, Margaret
    Summary:

    Legendary poet, novelist, and essayist Margaret Atwood gives us a surprising look at the topic of debt -- a timely subject during our current period of economic upheaval, caused by the collapse of a system of interlocking debts. Atwood proposes that debt is like air -- something we take for granted until things go wrong. Payback is not a book about practical debt management or high finance, although it does touch upon these subjects. Rather, it is an investigation into the idea of debt as an ancient and central motif in religion, literature, and the structure of human societies. By investigating how debt has informed our thinking from preliterate times to the present day through the stories we tell each other, through our concepts of balance, revenge, and sin, and in the way we form our social relationships, Atwood shows that the idea of what we owe one another -- in other words, debt -- is built into the human imagination and is one of its most dynamic metaphors.

  • Author:
    Highland, Carolyn
    Summary:

    Carolyn Highland’s outdoor writing will drive readers and outdoor enthusiasts to “get outside” and experience all that the natural world has to offer.Out Hereis a collection of essays that explores what the wilderness has to teach us about the human experience, using outdoor endeavours as extended metaphors for greater truths. Each carefully chosen piece embarks on a different physical and metaphorical journey: managing expectations and reality during a medical emergency in a 40-mile ski mountaineering race; staring down fear and consequences on exposed ski lines in Alaska; re-examining self-reliance and decision-making through heartbreak and snow science; and leaving room for unexpected magic as a female travelling through Patagonia.Highland’s first book inspires a deeper connection to the wilderness, a deeper connection to ourselves, and will leave readers wanting more from this fresh new voice in mountain writing.

  • Author:
    Donahue, Anne T.
    Summary:

    “The internet’s best friend.” — Flare From the author of the popular newsletter. That’s What She Said, Nobody Cares is a frank, funny personal essay collection about work, failure, friendship, and the messy business of being alive in your twenties and thirties. As she shares her hard-won insights from screwing up, growing up, and trying to find her own path, Anne T. Donahue’s debut book offers all the honesty, laughs, and reassurance of a late-night phone call with your best friend. Whether she’s giving a signature pep talk, railing against summer, or describing her own mental health struggles, Anne reminds us that failure is normal, saying no to things is liberating, and that we’re all a bunch of beautiful disasters — and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Author:
    Farnsworth, John Seibert
    Summary:

    John Seibert Farnsworth he lets us peer over his shoulder as he takes his notes. Follow him to a series of field stations where he teams up with scientists, citizen scientists, rangers, stewards, and grad students engaged in long-term ecological study, all the while scribbling down what he sees, hears, and feels in the moment. Farnsworth explores how communal experiences of nature might ultimately provide greater depths of appreciation for the natural world.

  • Author:
    League of Canadian Poets
    Summary:

    A society without poetry and the other arts would have broken its mirror and cut out its heart.--"Margaret Atwood. So boldly insists one of our greatest writers in Measures of Astonishment, a refreshing and eclectic mix of both deeply personal and formal essays that offer a glimpse into the minds of some of Canada's most influential poets. The contributors to this volume include Anne Carson, George Elliot Clarke, Anne Simpson, Tim Lilburn, Marilyn Bowering, A.F. Moritz, Mark Abley, Glen Sorestad, Robert Currie, Don McKay, Lillian Allen, and Gregory Scofield. Measures of Astonishment shines a northern light on poetry, offering unique perspectives as to what poetry is, what it does, and why it matters.

  • Author:
    MacLaren, Eli
    Summary:

    The Ryerson Poetry Chap-Books were a landmark achievement in Canadian poetry. Edited by Lorne Pierce, the series lasted for thirty-seven years (1925-62) and comprised two hundred titles by writers from Newfoundland to British Columbia, over half of whom were women. By examining this editorial feat, Little Resilienceoffers a new history of Canadian poetry in the twentieth century. Eli MacLaren analyzes the formation of the series in the wake of the First World War, at a time when small presses had proliferated across the United States. Pierce's emulation of them produced a series that contributed to the historic shift in the meaning of the term "chapbook" from an antique of folk culture to a brief collection of original poetry. By retreating to the smallest of forms, Pierce managed to work against the dominant industry pattern of the day - agency publishing, or the distribution of foreign editions. Original case studies of canonical and forgotten writers push through the period's defining polarity (modernism versus romanticism) to create complex portraits of the author during the Depression, the Second World War, and the 1950s. The stories of five Ryerson poets - Nathaniel A. Benson, Anne Marriott, M. Eugenie Perry, Dorothy Livesay, and Al Purdy - reveal poetry in Canada to have been a widespread vocation and a poor one, as fragile as it was irrepressible. The Ryerson Poetry Chap-Books were an unprecedented initiative to publish Canadian poetry. Little Resilienceevaluates the opportunities that the series opened for Canadian poets and the sacrifices that it demanded of them.

  • Author:
    Sedaris, David
    Summary:

    From the unique perspective of David Sedaris comes a new book of essays taking his readers on a bizarre and stimulating world tour. Whether railing against the habits of litterers in the English countryside or marveling over a disembodied human arm in a taxidermist's shop, Sedaris takes us on side-splitting adventures that are not to be forgotten.

  • Author:
    Arnold, Christine, Wilson, Mary, Bridge, Jean, Lennon, Mary Catherine
    Summary:

    There is increasing interest in the use of learning outcomes in postsecondary education, and deliberations have surfaced with regard to their potential to serve as a tool for advancing credit transfer. Learning Outcomes, Academic Credit, and Student Mobility assesses the conceptual foundations, assumptions, and implications of using learning outcomes for the purposes of postsecondary credit transfer and student mobility. Through a critical review of current approaches to the use of learning outcomes across national and international jurisdictions, scholars and practitioners in postsecondary education provide a multivalent examination of their potential impacts in the unique context of Ontario and recommend future directions for the system. The collected works are the culmination of a multi-year study entitled Learning Outcomes for Transfer, funded by the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer. Contributions are authored by prominent international scholars across countries with significant outcomes-based experience and education reforms (South Africa, the United States, Australia, Europe, and the United Kingdom) and an Ontario research consortium comprising college and university experts working to advance student pathways.

  • Author:
    Voisard, Anne-Marie
    Summary:

    Cet essai est né d'une expérience vécue. Il ne prend pas pour autant la forme d'un témoignage. Il ne s'agit pas non plus de rouvrir, par les voies détournées de l'écriture, deux procès que des règlements hors cour auraient laissé inachevés. Si l'affaire Noir Canada mérite d'être soumise à l'analyse, c'est en tant qu'elle est symptomatique de la violence sociale qui s'exerce par le dispositif judiciaire et qu'elle nous donne à voir, sous une forme paradigmatique, le rôle stratégique joué par le droit dans la cartographie contemporaine des rapports de pouvoir et de domination. Elle fonde ici la genèse d'une réflexion sur les perversions et les torsions d'un droit organisant la suspension de la justice au service des fins les moins irréprochables, d'un droit de la sortie du droit, d'un droit du plus fort.

  • Author:
    Hooks, Bell
    Summary:

    Twenty-three essays written from a black and feminist perspective ; they consider the bitter difficulties of racism by envisioning a world without it.

  • Author:
    Malette, Nicole
    Summary:

    Going to university or college is supposed to be “the best time of your life” … but what if it’s not? Research reveals that mental health issues are on the rise among undergrads, but many are not accessing help. If this is relatable, this book is for you. It addresses common sources of distress – including academic, social, parental, and financial pressures – and shows you how to meet those challenges head-on and where to turn for extra support. Packed with self-care strategies, quick tips, and eye-opening facts, this is an indispensable guide for anyone on the path to a degree.

  • Author:
    Tamtik, Merli, Trilokekar, Roopa Desai, Jones, Glen A.
    Summary:

    In the early twenty-first century international education emerged as an almost ubiquitous concept within discussions of educational curriculum; the objectives of schools, universities, and colleges; and government policies for K–12 and higher education. Although far from a new phenomenon, many jurisdictions now view international education as a highly competitive global industry. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of international education policy in Canada, tracing the complex history of when, how, and why it emerged as a policy area of strategic importance. Illuminating a uniquely Canadian perspective, influenced by regional interests and federal-provincial tensions, International Education as Public Policy in Canada addresses challenging questions: Why was Canada a latecomer in addressing this policy issue? What is the relationship between international education and Canadian immigration policy? How did international education develop as a major Canadian industry? The resulting essays from leading scholars contribute not only to the growing Canadian literature on international education policy but also to a critical, global conversation. Contemplating where the Canadian story of international education is headed, International Education as Public Policy in Canada calls for a broader debate on ethical practices in internationalization, focusing on inclusion, equity, compassion, and reciprocity.

  • Author:
    Ferrante, Elena
    Summary:

    Collected here for the first time are the seeds of future novels, the abiding preoccupations of a writer, and the timely reflections of this internationally beloved storyteller.

  • Author:
    Streeck, Wolfgang, Birch, Adelyn
    Summary:

    The provocative political thinker asks if it will be with a bang or a whimper In How Will Capitalism End? the acclaimed analyst of contemporary politics and economics Wolfgang Streeck argues that capitalism is now in a critical condition. Growth is giving way to secular stagnation; inequality is leading to instability; and confidence in the capitalist money economy has all but evaporated. Capitalism's shotgun marriage with democracy since 1945 is breaking up as the regulatory institutions restraining its advance have collapsed, and after the final victory of capitalism over its enemies no political agency capable of rebuilding them is in sight. The capitalist system is stricken with at least five worsening disorders for which no cure is at hand: declining growth, oligarchy, starvation of the public sphere, corruption and international anarchy. In this arresting book Wolfgang Streeck asks if we are witnessing a long and painful period of cumulative decay: of intensifying frictions, of fragility and uncertainty, and of a steady succession of 'normal accidents'.

  • Author:
    Hurston, Zora Neale
    Summary:

    A collection of stories about love and migration, gender and class, racism and sexism that proudly reflect African American folk culture. Brought together for the first time in one volume, they include eight of Hurston's "lost" Harlem stories, which were found in forgotten periodicals and archives.

  • Author:
    Crane, Dede, Moore, Lisa
    Summary:

    Edited by master storyteller Dede Crane and award-winning author Lisa Moore, both of whom contribute their own stories, Great Expectations is a must-have collection for parents and parents-to-be. Uniquely honest and transformative, Great Expectations takes the reader on an emotional and physical journey like no other: Lynn Coady relates the painful memory of her teenage pregnancy and the anguish of having to give up her newborn for adoption; Peter Behrens expresses a father's feeling of utter helplessness and incomparable joy during the birth of his first child; Christy Ann Conlin describes pregnancy at age forty; Afua Cooper reflects upon the immigrant's experience of three pregnancies and childbirths in a new land with evolving customs; Anne Fleming chooses a male donor with her same-sex partner; and Jaclyn Moriarty transcribes her grandmother's and her mother's birth stories, along with her own, to create a tender oral history spanning three generations.

  • Author:
    Haysom, Ian
    Summary:

    A sharp, funny, heartfelt memoir by a career-driven baby boomer who enters semi-retirement and explores the joys, challenges, and never-ending surprises of being a "young" granddad.One summer, shortly after taking a step back from an illustrious journalism career, Ian Haysom found himself in charge of his first grandchild, Mayana, who was three at the time. As a healthy, energetic member of the baby-boom generation, Haysom did not consider himself a typical granddad. He was too young, too active, too cool for a role more often associated with denture adhesive commercials and afternoon naps. But as he soon discovered, grandparenthood is more rewarding, entertaining, and exhausting than he ever could have imagined.Grandfatheredchronicles Haysom's adventures with his grandkids Mayana, Emma, and Linden; explores the delightful and unexpected lessons they have taught him (and those he has attempted to teach them); and investigates the rapidly changing role of the grandparent in the twenty-first century. Through keen observations, hilarious anecdotes, and fascinating insights reminiscent of Bill Bryson (or "Bill Bryson with a touch of arthritis," as Haysom quips), this charming memoir will resonate with boomer grandparents everywhere.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Essays