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Indigenous materials

  • Auteur:
    Point Bolton, Rena, Daly, Richard
    Sommaire:

    Xwelíqwiya is the life story of Rena Point Bolton, a Stó:lō matriarch, artist, and craftswoman. Proceeding by way of conversational vignettes, the beginning chapters recount Point Bolton's early years on the banks of the Fraser River during the Depression. While at the time the Stó:lō, or Xwélmexw, as they call themselves today, kept secret their ways of life to avoid persecution by the Canadian government, Point Bolton’s mother and grandmother schooled her in the skills needed for living from what the land provides, as well as in the craftwork and songs of her people, passing on a duty to keep these practices alive. Point Bolton was taken to a residential school for the next several years and would go on to marry and raise ten children, but her childhood training ultimately set the stage for her roles as a teacher and activist. Recognizing the urgent need to forge a sense of cultural continuity among the younger members of her community, Point Bolton visited many communities and worked with federal, provincial, and First Nations politicians to help break the intercultural silence by reviving knowledge of and interest in Aboriginal art. She did so with the deft and heartfelt use of both her voice and her hands. Over the course of many years, Daly collaborated with Point Bolton to pen her story. At once a memoir, an oral history, and an “insider” ethnography directed and presented by the subject herself, the result attests both to Daly’s relationship with the family and to Point Bolton’s desire to inspire others to use traditional knowledge and experience to build their own distinctive, successful, and creative lives.

  • Auteur:
    Wolfe, Beatrice
    Sommaire:

    The topics of addictions, sex trafficking, and sexual exploitation are best understood through a personal story. Understanding how it happens in our own communities regardless of race, gender or religious background is helpful for individuals, businesses and faith communities to engage in some way. Beatrice's life story (and her book "Wolf Woman") is an inspiring journey from brokenness towards healing. At once heartbreaking and hope-filled, vulnerable and tenacious, Wolfe's story shows the resiliency of the human spirit and the power of healing to create real-life change.

  • Auteur:
    Long Soldier, Layli
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    An astonishing, powerful debut. Whereas her birth signaled the responsibility as mother to teach what it is to be Lakota therein the question: What did I know about being Lakota? Signaled panic, blood rush my embarrassment. What did I know of our language but pieces? Would I teach her to be pieces? Until a friend comforted, Don't worry, you and your daughter will learn together. Today she stood sunlight on her shoulders lean and straight to share a song in Diné, her father's language. To sing she motions simultaneously with her hands; I watch her be in multiple musics. Whereas confronts the coercive language of the United States government in its responses, treaties, and apologies to Native American peoples and tribes, and reflects that language in its officiousness and duplicity back on its perpetrators. Through a virtuosic array of short lyrics, prose poems, longer narrative sequences, resolutions, and disclaimers, Layli Long Soldier has created a brilliantly innovative text to examine histories, landscapes, her own writing, and her predicament inside national affiliations. "I am," she writes, "a citizen of the United States and an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, meaning I am a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation, and in this dual citizenship I must work, I must eat, I must art, I must mother, I must friend, I must listen, I must observe, constantly I must live." This strident, plaintive book introduces a major new voice in contemporary literature. Layli Long Soldier earned a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts and an MFA with honors from Bard College. She is the author of the chapbook Chromosomory (2010). A citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation, Long Soldier lives in Tsaile, Arizona, in the Navajo Nation.

  • Auteur:
    Tremblay, Ida
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    This story takes readers on a journey into the past when dog teams were part of the traditional way of life in Northern Saskatchewan. It follows the seasonal cycle of trapline life.

  • Auteur:
    Yellowhorn, Eldon
    Sommaire:

    Unlike most books that chronicle the history of Native peoples beginning with the arrival of Europeans in 1492, this book goes back to the Ice Age to give young readers a glimpse of what life was like pre-contact. The title, Turtle Island, refers to a Native myth that explains how North and Central America were formed on the back of a turtle. Based on archeological finds and scientific research, we now have a clearer picture of how the Indigenous people lived. Using that knowledge, the authors take the reader back as far as 14,000 years ago to imagine moments in time. A wide variety of topics are featured, from the animals that came and disappeared over time, to what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to their surroundings. The importance of story-telling among the Native peoples is always present to shed light on how they explained their world. The end of the book takes us to modern times when the story of the Native peoples is both tragic and hopeful.

  • Auteur:
    Robinson, Eden
    Sommaire:

    In an effort to keep all forms of magic at bay, Jared, 17, has quit drugs and drinking. But his troubles are not over: now he's being stalked by David, his mom's ex--a preppy, khaki-wearing psycho with a proclivity for rib-breaking. And his mother, Maggie, a living, breathing badass as well as a witch, can't protect him like she used to because he's moved away from Kitimat to Vancouver for school. Even though he's got a year of sobriety under his belt (no thanks to his enabling, ever-partying mom), Jared also struggles with the temptation of drinking. And he's got to get his grades up, find a job that doesn't involve weed cookies, and somehow live peacefully with his Aunt Mave, who has been estranged from the family ever since she tried to "rescue" him as a baby from his mother. An indigenous activist and writer, Mave smothers him with pet names and hugs, but she is blind to the real dangers that lurk around them--the spirits and supernatural activity that fill her apartment. As the son of a Trickster, Jared is a magnet for magic, whether he hates it or not--he sees ghosts, he sees the monster moving underneath his Aunt Georgina's skin, he sees the creature that comes out of his bedroom wall and creepily wants to suck his toes. He also still hears the Trickster in his head, and other voices too. When the David situation becomes a crisis, Jared can't ignore his true nature any longer.

  • Auteur:
    Ruffo, Armand Garnet
    Sommaire:

    A treaty is a contract. A treaty is enduring. A treaty is an act of faith. A treaty at its best is justice. It is a document and an undertaking. It is connected to place, people and self. It is built on the past, but it also indicates how the future may unfold. Armand Garnet Ruffo's TREATY # is all of these. In this far-ranging work, Ruffo documents his observations on life - and in the process, his own life - as he sets out to restructure relationships and address obligations nation-to-nation, human-to-human, human-to-nature. Now, he undertakes a new phase in its restoration. He has written his TREATY # like a palimpsest over past representations of Indigenous bodies and beliefs, built powerful connections to his predecessors, and discovered new ways to bear witness and build a place for them, and all of us, in his poems. This is a major new work from an important, original voice.

  • Auteur:
    Main Johnson, Leslie
    Sommaire:

    Trail of Story examines the meaning of landscape, drawn from Leslie Main Johnson’s rich experience with diverse environments and peoples, including the Gitksan and Witsuwit’en of northwestern British Columbia, the Kaska Dene of the southern Yukon, and the Gwich’in of the Mackenzie Delta.With passion and conviction, Johnson maintains that our response to our environment shapes our culture, determines our lifestyle, defines our identity, and sets the tone for our relationships and economies. With photos, she documents the landscape and contrasts the ecological relationships with land of First Nations peoples to those of non-indigenous scientists. The result is an absorbing study of local knowledge of place and a broad exploration of the meaning of landscape.

  • Auteur:
    Belcourt, Billy-Ray
    Sommaire:

    Part manifesto, part memoir, This Wound is a World is an invitation to 'cut a hole in the sky to world inside.' Billy-Ray Belcourt issues a call to turn to love and sex to understand how Indigenous peoples shoulder sadness and pain like theirs without giving up on the future. His poems and essays upset genre and play with form, scavenging for a decolonial kind of heaven where 'everyone is at least a little gay'.

  • Auteur:
    William, Gerry
    Sommaire:

    A magical landscape as close as your own backyard, populated by the spirits of the animals and people, The Woman in the trees is a mythical exploration of the first contact between the Okanagans (the syilx) and early settlers, between orchardists and ranchers, between dream time and real time.

  • Auteur:
    De Lint, Charles
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    When various lives collide in the Hierro Maderas Mountains, each must struggle to escape a messy past and find a way to carve a future. They don't just have to learn how to survive. They have to learn how to fly.

  • Auteur:
    Manuel, Arthur, Derrickson, Ronald M.
    Sommaire:

    In this book Arthur Manuel and Grand Chief Ronald Derrickson challenge virtually everything that non-Indigenous Canadians believe about their relationship with Indigenous Peoples and the steps that are needed to place this relationship on a healthy and honourable footing. Manuel and Derrickson show how governments are attempting to reconcile with Indigenous Peoples without touching the basic colonial structures that dominate and distort the relationship. They review the current state of land claims. They tackle the persistence of racism among non-Indigenous people and institutions. They celebrate Indigenous Rights Movements while decrying the role of government-funded organizations like the Assembly of First Nations. They document the federal government's disregard for the substance of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples while claiming to implement it. These circumstances amount to what they see as a false reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians. Instead, Manuel and Derrickson offer an illuminating vision of what Canada and Canadians need for true reconciliation. In this book, which Arthur Manuel and Ron Derrickson completed in the months before Manuel's death in January 2017, readers will recognize their profound understanding of the country, of its past, present, and potential future. Expressed with quiet but firm resolve, humour, and piercing intellect The Reconciliation Manifesto will appeal to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are open and willing to look at the real problems and find real solutions.

  • Auteur:
    Kinew, Wab
    Sommaire:

    A moving father-son reconciliation told by a charismatic First Nations broadcaster, musician and activist. When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster and musician Wab Kinew decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant aboriginal man who'd raised him. The Reason You Walk spans the year 2012, chronicling painful moments in the past and celebrating renewed hopes and dreams for the future. As Kinew revisits his own childhood in Winnipeg and on a reserve in Northern Ontario, he learns more about his father's traumatic childhood at residential school. An intriguing doubleness marks The Reason You Walk, a reference to an Anishinaabe ceremonial song. Born to an Anishinaabe father and a non-native mother, he has a foot in both cultures. He is a Sundancer, an academic, a former rapper, a hereditary chief, and an urban activist. His father, Tobasonakwut, was both a beloved traditional chief and a respected elected leader who engaged directly with Ottawa. Internally divided, his father embraced both traditional native religion and Catholicism, the religion that was inculcated into him at the residential school where he was physically and sexually abused. In a grand gesture of reconciliation, Kinew's father invited the Roman Catholic bishop of Winnipeg to a Sundance ceremony in which he adopted him as his brother. Kinew writes affectingly of his own struggles in his twenties to find the right path, eventually giving up a self-destructive lifestyle to passionately pursue music and martial arts. From his unique vantage point, he offers an inside view of what it means to be an educated aboriginal living in a country that is just beginning to wake up to its aboriginal history and living presence.

  • Auteur:
    Jones, Stephen Graham
    Sommaire:

    A USA TODAY BESTSELLER A Publisher's Weekly Best Book of the Year "One of 2020's buzziest horror novels." — Entertainment Weekly A "Most Anticipated Books of Summer" selection in Esquire , Elle , Vulture , Time , AV Club , Bustle , and Literary Hub "Gritty and gorgeous" — The New York Times "Jones is one of the best writers working today regardless of genre, and this gritty, heartbreaking novel might just be his best yet." —NPR "Jones's latest horror novel sprints from start to finish." — The Washington Post "[A] stark page-turner." — Los Angeles Times "More than I could have asked for in a novel." —Tommy Orange, Pulitzer Prize finalist author of There There " A masterpiece." —Paul Tremblay, author of A Head Full of Ghosts and Survivor Song A tale of revenge, cultural identity, and the cost of breaking from tradition in this latest novel from the Jordan Peele of horror literature, Stephen Graham Jones. Seamlessly blending classic horror and a dramatic narrative with sharp social commentary, The Only Good Indians follows four American Indian men after a disturbing event from their youth puts them in a desperate struggle for their lives. Tracked by an entity bent on revenge, these childhood friends are helpless as the culture and traditions they left behind catch up to them in a violent, vengeful way.

  • Auteur:
    Teillet, Jean
    Sommaire:

    There is a missing chapter in the narrative of Canada's Indigenous peoples-- the story of the Métis Nation, a new Indigenous people descended from both First Nations and Europeans. Their story begins in the last decade of the eighteenth century in the Canadian North-West. Within twenty years the Métis proclaimed themselves a nation and won their first battle. Within forty years they were famous throughout North America for their military skills, their nomadic life and their buffalo hunts. The Métis Nation didn't just drift slowly into the Canadian consciousness in the early 1800s; it burst onto the scene fully formed. The Métis were flamboyant, defiant, loud and definitely not noble savages. They were nomads with a very different way of being in the world-- always on the move, very much in the moment, passionate and fierce. They were romantics and visionaries with big dreams. They battled continuously-- for recognition, for their lands and for their rights and freedoms. In 1870 and 1885, led by the iconic Louis Riel, they fought back when Canada took their lands. These acts of resistance became defining moments in Canadian history, with implications that reverberate to this day: Western alienation, Indigenous rights and the French/English divide. After being defeated at the Battle of Batoche in 1885, the Métis lived in hiding for twenty years. But early in the twentieth century, they determined to hide no more and began a long, successful fight back into the Canadian consciousness. The Métis people are now recognized in Canada as a distinct Indigenous nation. Written by the great-grandniece of Louis Riel, this popular and engaging history of "forgotten people" tells the story up to the present era of national reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

  • Auteur:
    Choyce, Lesley, Joe, Rita
    Sommaire:

    A varied and spirited collection of work by the Mi’kmaq writers of Atlantic Canada, this volume brings together young and old and includes short stories, autobiography, poetry and personal essays. Valuable as a landmark of an ancient culture, The Mi’kmaq Anthology also delivers to a wide audience the wealth of creative talent within the Mi’kmaq community. Although many voices here are new to the reading public, this volume radiates with deep spirituality, social awareness, intellectual energy and a passionate concern for preserving the Mi’kmaq way of life.Authors include Don Julien, Lindsay Marshall, Murdena Marshall, Mary Louise Martin, Elsie Charles Basque, Shirley Kiju Kawi, Noel Knockwood, Helen Sylliboy, Marie Batiste, Theresa Meuse, Isabelle Knockwood, Katherine Sorbey, Daniel N. Paul, Sunset Rose Morris, Harold Gloade and Rita Joe.

  • Auteur:
    Corneau, Michelle
    Sommaire:

    Anna explores what it means to be Mohawk, her own identity and the identity of others as she learns to follow the Eagle’s path. She learns how her culture has taught many generations to value honesty, wisdom and courage in their day-to-day lives. Anna also learns about two-spirit people when her best friend tells her that she likes other girls. This revelation leaves her full of questions, and with support from her wise and loving mother, she understands the value in accepting everyone for who they are. A powerful story to share with children of all ages.

  • Auteur:
    Friesen, Gerald
    Sommaire:

    Native leaders, immigrant farm families, Alberta oil barons, and political reformers all have prominent roles in this live and comprehensive history of the prairie west. Drawing upon recent research- hundreds of books, articles, and government reports- in native, labour, and urban history, as well as his own work in social and intellectual movements, Gerald Friesen has created a new, authoritative interpretation of the prairie experience.

  • Auteur:
    Taylor, Drew Hayden
    Sommaire:

    "Drew Hayden Taylor works his delightfully comic, and bittersweet magic in these two plays about children growing up Native in a non-Native world. In 'The boy in the treehouse,' Simon pursues a vision quest in an attempt to reclaim his mother's First Nations heritage. In 'Girl who loved horses,' a non-status girls finds people on the Reserve understand her remarkable talent and the power of her storng spirt more than those around her. In each play, Taylor moves beyond the denials, misunderstandings and preconceptions that populate our differences and rediscovers the nature of, and the necessity for, rites of passage in all cultures." -- Publisher.

  • Auteur:
    Gauthier, Clayton
    Sommaire:

    A mother bear shares with her cubs how to be grateful for all they have in the natural world. The Bear's Medicine shows the interconnectedness of all things in the world they live in and how each season brings changes and blessings for the bears. It is a story of a mother's love for her children as she teaches them how to survive.

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